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#9

in 2011 Luxury Large Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $28,536 - $32,735
Original MSRP: $47,200 - $55,150
MPG: 17 City / 24 Hwy
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2011 Acura RL Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

The 2011 Acura RL’s interior earns points for refined, high-tech features that most rivals can’t match. While one reviewer notes that graphics on the optional navigation system are starting to look a bit dated compared to some of the competition, the system is generally well-liked, and considered more user-friendly than what’s available from BMW or Mercedes.

The front seats are generally considered roomy and comfortable, with good adjustability. However, the RL still falls short when it comes to cargo and back seat room, which is a bit less than what’s available in large luxury cars like the Infiniti M and the Mercedes-Benz E-Class. Still, quality materials are evident throughout, and most surfaces are soft touch or padded.

  • "Acura claims the 2011 is quieter inside, thanks to resonator devices that are said to chop 1.3 decibels off the tire-noise scale. With the new resonators, the RL isn’t yet as quiet as, say, a Lexus LS, although the Acura’s noise levels can hardly be characterized as loud." -- Car and Driver 
  • "The 2011 Acura RL features an attractive and well-built interior that is comparable to most other luxury sedans. The wood trim -- simulated or authentic depending on the model trim level -- frames the waterfall-style center stack, adding warmth to the overall interior design." -- Edmunds 
  • "Inside RL makes its strongest statement, with such features as with 10-way power-adjustable, heated and cooled front seats, and a host of high tech goodies." -- Motor Trend 
  • "Kudos go out for spacious accommodations, the Technology Package's triple-setting heated and cooled front seats, padding in all the right places, and a cabin that's both quiet and easy to enter and exit. We were less enamored by the driver seat's lack of lower support during long drives, perforated leather upholstery that felt like it had been borrowed from a Honda, an utter lack of storage provisions for rear seat passengers, and a sunken cargo floor that required lifting heavy items several inches." -- Kelley Blue Book 
  • "Further, more room in the rear seat and trunk would help Acura cajole fifty large out of more than 200 to 300 people per month. In other words, the RL needs more than this refresh -- it needs a replacement." -- Car and Driver 
  • "Most adults will find sufficient headroom and legroom. Some shorter drivers may feel a bit ’buried,’ but ample seat adjustments compensate." -- Consumer Guide 
  • "Major gauges are large, clearly marked, and easy to read at a glance. The center control panel is awash in small buttons that are too similar in look and feel. Centered on the console is a tilting and rotating knob that acts as the primary control for the navigation system; mastering its use requires time and patience." -- Consumer Guide 
  • "There are quite a few buttons and knobs in the cockpit, but the voice-activated system and controls on the steering wheel deliver easier operation. We found the standard 10-speaker Bose audio system particularly notable for its clarity and power. On the downside, the navigation system's graphics seem outdated when compared to competing luxury sedans." -- Edmunds 
  • "Acura has fitted its largest sedan with not only the usual bits like a Bose sound system and power features tied to a driver-side memory function, but also a universal serial bus (USB) port located in the center console that offers quick and seamless access to tunes on your iPod, and an Active Sound Control system that does a commendable job of muting engine noise." -- Kelley Blue Book 
  • "The wide trunk extends well forward but lacks height for really big cargo. RL's sickle-shape trunk lid hinges are covered but eat up space. Most rivals have compact strut-type hinges. The rear seat back has a small pass-through but doesn't fold. Cabin storage is unexceptional." -- Consumer Guide 
  • "The trunk space also leaves a bit to be desired, accommodating a slightly below-average 13.1 cubic feet." -- Edmunds 

Seating

With six temperature settings and 10-way power adjustment, the front seats of the 2011 Acura RL do not disappoint. Rear seat room, however, is slightly less than what’s available in some of the competition. If you frequently have adults in the back seat, you may also want to check out the Infiniti M and the Mercedes-Benz E-Class for improved accommodations.

  • "Further, more room in the rear seat and trunk would help Acura cajole fifty large out of more than 200 to 300 people per month. In other words, the RL needs more than this refresh -- it needs a replacement." -- Car and Driver 
  • "Most adults will find sufficient headroom and legroom. Some shorter drivers may feel a bit ’buried,’ but ample seat adjustments compensate." -- Consumer Guide 

Interior Features

Acura is known for offering cutting-edge tech in the cabins of their cars and SUVS; however some reviewers note that the button-heavy dash can be a bit overwhelming. The navigation system can also take some time to master, and one reviewer notes that the graphics appeared outdated compared to the competition.

Despite these qualms reviewers still like the navigation system, noting that it’s easier to use than BMW’s iDrive or Mercedes’s COMAND system. As part of the RL’s optional technology package, the voice-controlled navigation system also provides current weather and real-time traffic reports. Another unique option is the RL’s solar-sensing climate control system, which takes the position of the sun into account when adjusting the temperature.

  • "Major gauges are large, clearly marked, and easy to read at a glance. The center control panel is awash in small buttons that are too similar in look and feel. Centered on the console is a tilting and rotating knob that acts as the primary control for the navigation system; mastering its use requires time and patience." -- Consumer Guide 
  • "There are quite a few buttons and knobs in the cockpit, but the voice-activated system and controls on the steering wheel deliver easier operation. We found the standard 10-speaker Bose audio system particularly notable for its clarity and power. On the downside, the navigation system's graphics seem outdated when compared to competing luxury sedans." -- Edmunds 
  • "Acura has fitted its largest sedan with not only the usual bits like a Bose sound system and power features tied to a driver-side memory function, but also a universal serial bus (USB) port located in the center console that offers quick and seamless access to tunes on your iPod, and an Active Sound Control system that does a commendable job of muting engine noise." -- Kelley Blue Book 

Cargo

At 13.1 cubic feet, the trunk of the 2011 Acura RL is one of the smallest in its class, and interior storage is just average. Look to the BMW 5-Series, Mercedes E-Class or Lincoln MKS for more trunk space in the class of luxury large cars. While none of these competitors offer the RL’s standard all-wheel drive, it is available as an option.

  • "The wide trunk extends well forward but lacks height for really big cargo. RL's sickle-shape trunk lid hinges are covered but eat up space. Most rivals have compact strut-type hinges. The rear seat back has a small pass-through but doesn't fold. Cabin storage is unexceptional." -- Consumer Guide 
  • "The trunk space also leaves a bit to be desired, accommodating a slightly below-average 13.1 cubic feet." -- Edmunds 
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product