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Avg. Price Paid:$10,931 - $11,215
Original MSRP: $28,090 - $30,090
MPG: 22 City / 30 Hwy
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2007 Acura TSX Performance

This performance review was written when the 2007 Acura TSX was new.

The 2007 Acura TSX impressed reviewers by delivering a sporty, powerful ride that doesn't sacrifice comfort. The Washington Post says that the TSX "boogies big time on the open road." "Let's face it, the TSX exists to be driven hard and fast," writes About.com. "That it can also be used as a comfortable family car is a bonus." "During less spirited driving, observes Edmunds, "the TSX makes good on its promise as a luxury brand and provides a solid, compliant ride that always feels just right."

USA TODAY praises the "TSX's tight, crisp demeanor," which it calls "a reminder that when the car is happy, you're happy. A car that struggles is stress on a stick. TSX is opposite that -- confident and poised, encouraging you to feel the same." The most common complaint raised by reviewers is the engine's lack of low-end torque. This can cause the TSX to "feel sluggish initially," according to Gayot.com, "but once you start zinging the free-revving VTEC motor ... the TSX has plenty of giddy-up."

Acceleration and Power

The TSX has a four-cylinder, 205-horsepower VTEC engine. No upgrade to a V6 is available, and most reviewers don't think it is necessary. "The engine is amazingly smooth and effortless," writes The Auto Channel. "What a hoot! I love a quick little sport sedan." U.S. News reviewer Rick Newman deems the engine "as confident as many V-6's, with less rumble and strain." Motor Week calls throttle response "crisp and immediate. This four-cylinder builds power with the strength and smoothness of a six." The same review also says, however, "Many sport sedan buyers will miss those extra cylinders."

The Chicago Tribune says that "the 2.4-liter is alert," but also points out the most common problem with the TSX engine cited by reviewers: "It could use a little more low-end torque." The TSX makes 164 pound-feet of torque at 4500 rpm. USA TODAY says that the TSX "is right on horsepower and wrong on torque because it's the stop-and-go power most useful in the USA," before concluding that the "TSX isn't too bad around town, specifications notwithstanding." The TSX has an Environmental Protection Agency estimated fuel economy of 19 miles per gallon in the city and 28 miles per gallon on the highway when paired with a manual transmission.

The engine is paired with either a close-ratio six-speed manual transmission or a five-speed automatic. MSN observes: "Its six-speed manual transmission ... must be shifted a lot for the best acceleration when, for example, merging or passing. The close-ratio transmission works with a long-throw clutch, which would be a pain in stop-and-go traffic except that it has a light action. An available five-speed automatic transmission stifles performance a little, but is responsive and allows brisk acceleration."

Some reviewers argue that the TSX is far sportier with the six-speed. "Keep the revs up on the manual transmission and the Acura TSX can be tossed from corner to corner with confidence. With the automatic, the TSX just doesn't exhibit the same fun-to-drive characteristics," writes Autobytel. Other reviewers don't find the manual transmission indispensable. "We love the six-speed manual transmission as it makes you feel like a pro driver with its short, precise shifts," says Edmunds. "Amazingly, we can't complain much about the automatic either."

Handling and Braking

Independent double-wishbone front suspension and multi-link rear suspension combine to give the TSX a ride that MSN calls "firm, but not harsh." New Car Test Drive writes: "The TSX makes a dancer out of you, and the suspension is your partner. It's heavy for its size, but it's delicate to handle. It's sweet, but not touchy. It makes you a better driver, not because it requires you to be one, but because it enables you to be. If you can coordinate your hands and feet, and maintain a delicate touch, the TSX will pirouette on a dime for you."

Reviewers found the TSX's ride to be more sport than sedan. Forbes says, "It is both one of the sportiest things about the vehicle and one of the reasons why this [is] not the most luxurious luxury car. So tightly sprung that it would mortify a Mercedes driver, the TSX's suspension is designed to connect you with the road, not isolate you from it, like the suspensions of many other luxury cars. Something about the TSX makes you feel low to the ground and hyper-aware of its contours."

The Boston Globe notes that the TSX "sits totally flat in highway lane changes, does not dive when braked, does not lift when heavy gas is applied at launch, and showed only slight body roll in a series of fast, sharp S-curves." Motor Week praises "the light, responsive feel that we demand in a first class sport sedan." USA TODAY says, "Corners are sliced and diced with little fuss. Daily cut-and-thrust is no sweat if you're in the right gear."

Four-wheel anti-lock disc brakes quickly bring the TSX to zero. Reviewers noted short stopping distances and good stability during braking. New Car Test Drive notes, "Its brakes will bring you down from triple digits so smoothly and quickly you would never have believed you were up there." Consumer Guide says that the "powerful brakes have excellent pedal feel."

Performance Options

The TSX is available only with a four-cylinder engine, which some reviewers believe could turn away a few potential owners. As Edmunds puts it, "This is a luxury-branded car, and even the Accord can be had with a V6, right?" As Forbes points out, however, the only way to get a V6 is "to upgrade to the Acura TL, which is based on the larger U.S.-specification Accord."

Review Last Updated: 5/2/08

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