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2010 DBS
Original MSRP: $266,000 - $279,500
MPG: 11 City / 17 Hwy
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2010 DBS Review

This review was written when the 2010 DBS was new.

The 2010 Aston Martin DBS is a refined, exotic sports grand tourer. It’s the type of car people drive to make a statement that almost no one can match. "It looks fast but mature - no boy-racer scoops, no wild stripes," writes the New York Times.

The 2010 Aston Martin DBS is a performance-tuned variant of the 2010 Aston Martin DB9, an exotic sports car that’s widely praised for its mammoth V12 engine, elegant interior cabin and sultry exterior design.

More exotic and exclusive than ever, the 2010 Aston Martin DBS features enhanced performance features -- including 40 additional horsepower, superior interior refinement and show-stopping sex appeal to spare. It carries an expensive price tag too. However, critics say that few cars can provide as much satisfaction as this rare beauty. Left Lane News describes the 2010 Aston Martin DBS as "an ultra-refined grand touring supercar that handles beautifully, sounds like thunder when pressed, and has beautiful lines to boot."

The 2010 Aston Martin DBS coupe carries into the year unchanged. An all-new Volante trim -- which features a convertible soft-top -- is available. Its performance components match its coupe sibling.

  • "The DBS is a modified version of Aston's already highly desirable DB9. Like Daniel Craig's muscular, tuxedo-clad Bond, the DBS is strikingly handsome, yet its bulging fenders and more chiseled fascia give the impression that it can kick your teeth in if you challenge it." -- Edmunds
  • "In a feat we hardly thought possible, Aston has made the DBS coupe even more attractive by removing its roof. Beautifully detailed inside and out, the Volante oozes luxury and style and provides a thrilling experience on an winding road. One of the world's greatest tanning salons." -- Car and Driver
  • "It's tremendous fun to run up behind an SUV with adolescent boys in the back and watch as, their noses pressed against the rear window, their little minds become permanently warped with car fever. Their mouths go slack, their eyes spin. The Aston is the end of automotive innocence for them. Xbox will never be the same." -- Los Angeles Times
  • "The Volante is a complete package - high levels of craftsmanship, real materials, solid engineering - all coming at a pretty penny, $282,500 for the manual and $286,500 for the automatic. Expensive? Yes. Exclusive? Very. Only 1000 DBS models will be built each year, of which about half will be convertibles." -- Road and Track
  • "There's no question that DBS offers a truly special driving experience. Whether or not that's worth the absolutely stratospheric price is up to you." -- Consumer Guide

The Bottom Line

The 2010 Aston Martin DBS packs the three P’s: power, prestige and panache. But given its lofty sticker price, buying one is extreme and irrational. If you can afford to make such a decision, lucky you -- you’ve done something right in your life.

The 2010 Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano is the 2010 Aston Martin DBS’s primary competitor. It packs over 100 more horsepower, blasts from 0 to 60 in the low three-second range, and provides greater sports car handling. However, the 599 GTB Fiorano starts around $15K more. Still, that’s pocket change to folks shopping in this class.

In the end, deciding between the two may just come down to personal preference. However, serious shoppers should test drive both -- as some critics find that the 2010 Aston Martin DBS is better suited for everyday driving.

Performance Dynamics

The 2010 Aston Martin DBS may not be as fast or agile as competitors like the Ferrari 599 GTB Fiorano, but it’s every bit as satisfying. This high-performance grand tourer riles the senses and burns rubber like few cars can.

The 2010 Aston Martin DBS is equipped with a 5.9-liter V12 engine that generates 510 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 570 pound-feet of torque at 5,750 rpm. It is available with two transmissions -- a six-speed manual transmission or a Touchtronic 2 six-speed with an electronic shift-by-wire control system. According to Aston Martin, the 2010 DBS can reach a top speed of 191 mph and accelerate from 0 to 62 mph in just 4.3 seconds.

The EPA reports that the 2010 Aston Martin DBS has a city/highway fuel economy of 11/17 mpg when equipped with a manual transmission. With the automatic, fuel efficiency increases to 12/18 mpg.

The rear-wheel-drive 2010 Aston Martin DBS features rack-and-pinion, Servotronic speed-sensitive power-assisted steering, as well as an independent front/rear double wishbone suspension with an Adaptive Damping System (ADS) and Track mode. Bringing the 2010 Aston Martin DBS to a halt are ventilated carbon ceramic disc brakes, as well as a long list of brake and stability enhancing features -- including an Anti-lock Braking System, Dynamic Stability Control, Traction Control, Electronic Brakeforce Distribution and Emergency Brake Assist.

  • "As much as we enjoy a good ear-bleeding stereo, we'd rather listen to the roar of the V-12, spurred by a stomp on the gas pedal and a few quick taps at the downshift paddle. The resultant explosive burst of acceleration sends the traction control system scrambling to keep the rear wheels in line, as the power can easily overwhelm the grip of even these massive, 11.6-inch-wide tires. In less frantic driving, the transmission can be left in drive, in which it does a convincingly smooth approximation of a conventional automatic." -- Automobile Magazine
  • "The DBS Volante offers an optional Touchtronic six-speed automatic transmission that when operated by the paddle shifters, becomes, to our touch, one of the fastest shifting paddle arrangements in the business." -- Left Lane News
  • "With a 0-to-60 time of 4.2 seconds, grip at 0.96 g, a 60-to-0 stopping distance of 106 feet, it's the quickest, stickiest, and shortest-stopping Aston Martin we've ever tested. And it feels so good doing it. The engine whirs and warbles as only a V-12 can. There's a ton of grip and good body control, yet the ride harshness isn't over the top." -- Motor Trend
  • "The exhaust emits a brutal howl and the 5.9-liter V-12 explodes toward its 510-horsepower peak output in a ferocious rush. The paddle-shifted transmission cracks off gear changes with absolutely no concern for subtlety or decorum. Monstrous brake calipers grip the carbon-ceramic rotors hard enough, it seems, to pull your nose off your face." -- New York Times
  • "Driven in anger, the DBS Volante is an aural delight and satisfyingly responsive. Even in sport mode, the ride is firm but never abusive. Prodigious power is available throughout the engine's range, and working the chunky metal shifter through its detents quickly becomes addictive. The huge brakes bring everything to a halt with eye-popping capability. There's no fade or squealing, just smooth, solid feedback through the pedal (and a seatbelt trying to slice your torso in half)." -- Car and Driver
  • "How does the Volante drive? Exquisitely. Big, powerful, quick and seriously, three-digit fast. The steering is razor sharp. The carbon-ceramic brakes are freaking land anchors. There's serious grip everywhere. But the Volante is never less than utterly, magically refined." -- Los Angeles Times
  • "Delightful. DBS is more driver's car than grand tourer. It corners with excellent grip and zero body lean. The steering is precise and well weighted. Powerful brakes with carbon ceramic rotors deliver short stops with fine pedal control." -- Consumer Guide
  • "All of this technology and mechanical sophistication is great, and we're happy to report that everything works perfectly. We took our test car on various tracks and roads and were impressed with how well the DBS performed no matter the situation. Solid steering feel and great brakes combined with a linear powerband gave all drivers great confidence." -- Road & Track
Review Last Updated: 5/6/10

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