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#13

in 2012 Upscale Midsize Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $29,562 - $36,757
Original MSRP: $37,100 - $44,700
MPG: 21 City / 31 Hwy
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2012 Audi A5 Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Critics generally agree that the 2012 Audi A5 features a lavish and comfortable cabin, but some take issue with the A5’s high-tech gadgetry. Testers agree that the A5 is swathed in high-quality materials and find Audi’s attention to detail rewarding for passengers. But its cabin electronics require some study to get the most use out of them. Not unlike competing coupes and convertibles, such as the BMW 3-Series and Infiniti G37, the A5’s back seats are lacking when it comes to space.

  • "The beige leather with contrasting darker areas was attractive and the interior bits certainly are well put together, but the cabin overall lacked some visual sparkle compared to newer competitors." -- Automobile Magazine 
  • "At a company known for its brilliant interiors - both in design and execution - the A5 and S5 don't disappoint." -- Kelley Blue Book 

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Seating

The 2012 Audi A5 provides seating for four, though auto writers report that its back seat won't keep adults comfortable for extended periods of time. Overall, test drivers are mixed on the A5's seats. While some drivers find the seats comfortable, others say the standard seats lack support and that it can be tough to find a comfortable driving position.

  • "The A5 offers a lot more daily usability than the strictly two-place TT coupe. (Okay, granted, that car has a pair of rear seats, but they're sized for briefcases, not for people.)" -- Automobile Magazine 
  • "The comfort of the front seats is quite good for long road trips, but the seats lack the type of lateral support that a spirited driver desires. Thankfully, the optional sport seats remedy this problem. Unfortunately, there's no fix for the rear seats, as the lack of head- and legroom makes them suitable for smaller passengers only." -- Edmunds 
  • "The leather-upholstered front buckets provide that often elusive combination of accessibility and lateral support, while the rear seating area serves as a comfortable enclave for two." -- Kelley Blue Book 
  • "The front seats are supportive, though some of our testers find it difficult to achieve a comfortable driving position." -- Consumer Guide

Interior Features

Audi is known for its high-quality interiors, and while most reviewers agree that the 2012 A5 combines excellent build quality with premium materials, Audi’s Multi-Media Interface (MMI) requires some time to master. MMI controls most vehicle audio, climate and navigation functions, and test drivers say that its steep learning curve can easily confuse first-time users.

  • "The standard dash-mounted MMI controller isn't nearly as easy to operate as the unit that comes with the optional navigation system. The standard MMI requires a few extra steps compared to the optional MMI, which benefits from simplified menus and a more favorable console-mounted controller." -- Edmunds 
  • "Audi's Multi Media Interface system governs various functions, including the optional navigation system, with a central knob behind the gearshift. The system also features shortcut buttons surrounding the knob, but uninitiated drivers might still find it confusing." -- Cars.com 
  • "The standard tilt and telescopic steering wheel does not offer power operation, which we find a bit odd." -- Consumer Guide

Cargo

Despite its 12.4 cubic feet of cargo space and 60/40-folding rear seatbacks, some reviewers criticize the A5 Coupe for having a narrow trunk, which makes it difficult to load bulky items. Because the A5 Cabriolet has a soft top rather than a retractable hardtop, it’s a convertible that still has usable cargo space. While hardtop convertible rivals like the BMW 3-Series and Infiniti G37 have limited trunk space with their tops down, the ragtop A5 has 10.2 cubic feet for cargo.

  • "The al fresco driving experience doesn't come at the expense of trunk space. With the top down, the trunk can still accommodate 11.4 cubic feet of cargo, only 2.1 cubes less than the coupe. The coupe also benefits from folding rear seats for added convenience." -- Edmunds 
  • "The trunk has a good amount of space, but it's narrow and not very tall, which precludes hauling even moderately bulky items. Split-folding rear seatbacks are a nice, unexpected convenience. Interior storage includes large door pockets, a modestly sized glovebox, and a small center console." -- Consumer Guide
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