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#2

in 2011 Luxury Compact SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $27,597 - $37,957
Original MSRP: $35,200 - $42,500
MPG: 20 City / 27 Hwy
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2011 Audi Q5 Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Automotive editors find it hard to dislike the 2011 Audi Q5’s interior. It’s high quality, comfortable, and its impressive standard features list includes things like decorative wood inlays and a leather wrapped steering wheel with mounted controls. Most reviewers offer nothing but high praise for the 2011 Q5, but there are a few negative critiques. Some reviewers find rear leg room limited for adults, and others think the interior controls are confusing.

However, these complaints are few and far between, but there is one common thread in reviewer comments: The 2011 Audi Q5 gets pricey once you start adding interior features. Shoppers who want options like power adjustable seats, a power tailgate, HD radio and a Bang & Olufsen sound system should expect to pay around $40,000.

  • "Inside, the Q5 has all the inherent benefits attributed to SUVs: the driving position is higher up with a good view of the road, there is plenty of storage in and around the cabin, and with a 110.5-inch wheelbase, there is legroom for adults in the back seat." -- AutoWeek
  • "The interior is tightly built, ergonomically satisfying, and very attractive. Standard leather-trimmed seats and steering wheel and walnut inlays give the cabin an upscale feel, and there are no chintzy materials anywhere to mar the overall effect." -- BusinessWeek
  • "It has the confident handling and alert responses of the A4, yet the Q5's decent cargo hold and generous passenger space mean it's pretty comfortable and practical, too. Indeed, its family-friendly sliding rear seat is the only one of its kind among luxury crossovers of this size." -- Edmunds

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Seating

The Audi Q5 comes standard with leather seating for five, and most reviewers find it comfortable and roomy whether you sit in the front or the back. A few, however, say the rear row is only adequate for small adults, which means that some passengers may be short on leg room. However, if you’ll use the Q5 to drive your kids to school and to extracurricular activities, they’ll have more than enough space. The Q5 comes with power front seats and heated front seats on Premium Plus and Prestige trims.

  • "The 2011 Audi Q5 is also among the segment's roomier entries." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Despite its compact size, the Q5 manages to feel roomy whether you're seated in the front or rear. The rear seats slide fore and aft, which is a rarity in this segment of luxury crossovers, and the seats also recline for greater comfort." -- Edmunds
  • "I found the front seats very comfortable. Foot, knee, and head space in back are adequate for average-size adults." -- BusinessWeek
  • "Restricted rear seat legroom." -- Motor Trend

Interior Features

The 2011 Q5’s high-quality interior makes it one of the top cars in the class. It comes standard with luxury features like heated power mirrors, a leather-wrapped multifunction steering wheel with controls for audio volume, Bluetooth and audio seek functions, automatic climate control, wood decorative inlays, satellite radio and an Audi concert system that has a single CD player with MP3 playback capability, an auxiliary input jack and speed-dependent audio controls. The top-of-the-line Prestige trim adds a lot more features, but it starts at about $50,000 – $14,500 more than the base model. But, with the Prestige trim, you get 12-way power adjustable seats, an iPod cable, HD Radio, a Bang & Olufsen sound system, as well as navigation with voice control for directory and telephone and push button start.

You may think that $50,000 is a lot for a fully loaded compact SUV. Reviewers agree: That is expensive. However, they do say that the Audi Q5 doesn’t skimp on luxury, so if you can afford to pay about $33,000 or more for the Q5, you won’t be disappointed.

Overall, reviewers are quite impressed with the Q5’s interior. Materials quality outranks many cars in the class, and its long list of available features allows you to build an interior that caters to your needs. Some auto critics do have two complaints, however. Drivers who don’t choose the navigation system may find the stereo difficult to use because it’s angled away from the driver. Also, some reviewers find the center console difficult to use, so it’s a good idea to test this system thoroughly.

  • "Like other Audis, the Q5 benefits from classy interior design and top-notch construction." -- Edmunds
  • "For some functions, there are steering-wheel-mounted controls, too. Not all of them are intuitive to use: The trip computer, for instance, is operated via switches on the windshield wiper control arm, which were hard to find. I was able to figure everything out in a few days, however, without having to resort to the owner's manual." -- BusinessWeek

Cargo

The 2011 Audi Q5's cargo capacity is a bit small compared to other luxury compact SUVs. You can fit 29.1 cubic feet of luggage with all seats in use and 57.3 cubic feet with the rear seats folded down. What really sets the Q5 apart are its utilitarian interior features. One is a sliding rear seat, which can move about four inches forward to allow for more cargo space. Another is its glovebox, which has an air conditioner vent for cooling.

  • "Functionally, the Q5 is a dandy, with 29.1 cubic feet of storage behind the rear seats. With those seats folded, which can be accomplished with a single touch, the Q5 can swallow 57.3 cubes; it could take a few more if the second row folded completely flat, but at least the seats can be locked down. The cargo floor’s height makes loading items easy, although it’s not yet as manageable as a station wagon’s and there’s a handy storage bin below the cargo floor." -- Car and Driver
  • "Cargo capacity is excellent.” -- BusinessWeek
  • "The long wheelbase model offers rear-seat legroom at the top of the class but doesn't translate to cargo volume, which trails the competition." -- Motor Trend