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#8

in 2009 Luxury Midsize SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $20,567 - $28,524
Original MSRP: $43,500 - $59,220
MPG: 14 City / 20 Hwy
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2009 Audi Q7 Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Reviewers praised the 2009 Q7's high level of luxury and versatile cargo space, but complained about the complicated electronics.

  • "The MMI is nice once you get used to it...there's a steep learning curve. And some of it just doesn't make sense -- most of the controls use that big center dial, but fan speed and seat heat use the climate control's temperature dials. Huh? It's one thing if you have a passenger to fiddle with it all, but a lone driver trying to figure out MMI at 70 MPH is an accident waiting to happen." -- About.com
  • "First-rate finish, with good-quality materials. The overall atmosphere is a bit dull, however. S line models in particular lack warmth or sportiness, as there's very little aluminum trim, and most other materials are funeral black." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Like all Audis, the Q7 ranks high in interior materials and build quality. The dash layout is driver-oriented, and Audi's MMI (on trims so equipped) is relatively easy to use once you've had some practice." -- Edmunds

Seating

The Audi Q7 has a large exterior, which means it's spacious inside. Audi claims that the versatile seats can be arranged into 28 different seating and cargo arrangements, but some of these are more comfortable than others.

  • "The Q7 has three rows of seats; any two can be occupied comfortably at once. The second-row seats are adjustable, but sliding them back far enough for decent footroom squashes the toes of the people in the 3rd row. Want room in both the 2nd and 3rd rows? Fine, provided the front driver and passenger don't mind kissing the dashboard." -- About.com
  • "I was able to get comfortable in the Q7's leather front bucket seats, though very tall drivers might wish they could move farther back. There's generous foot and legroom in the second row, and these seats recline and slide fore and aft. The seats closest to the windows are firmly cushioned but comfortable, while the center spot feels like sitting on a leather-covered park bench -- it's that hard." -- Cars.com
  • "Athletic moves are needed to reach the third-row-seat area, which is best left to children or to adults no more than 5 feet 3 inches tall." -- MSN
  • "In the third row, no adult would be comfortable, and few children over five feet would want to ride here for more than 20 minutes. ... People who will use the third row more frequently will want something bigger than the Q7." -- Forbes
  • "Q7 offers fine legroom, and affords generous headroom due to a wide ranging seat-height adjuster. The firm seats are long-haul comfortable and have a multitude of adjustments. Power-adjustable pedals are unavailable, but a tilt and telescopic steering wheel--power on 4.2--is standard." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The amount of interior space depends on seating configuration; while the second row is relatively roomy, the optional third row is cramped and can only comfortably seat children or small adults -- which is a little disappointing, considering the Q7's size." -- Edmunds

Interior Features

The 2009 Q7 is luxurious and well-equipped. The available Multimedia Interface (MMI), Audi's version of BMW's iDrive control system, operates most of the information, climate and entertainment systems in the vehicle, and many found it difficult to learn and use. New standard features for 2009 included a premium audio system and satellite radio.

  • "We've put thousands of miles on our long-term Q7 test vehicle and remain impressed by its collection of luxury features, versatile and beautifully crafted interior." -- Edmunds
  • "The dashboard and center console are populated with numerous buttons and switches, despite the aim of the MMI system to reduce such clutter. The MMI system thoughtfully leaves routine climate adjustments to separate controls, but it absorbs most audio functions, rendering many distracting and time consuming. Interacting with MMI for navigation and vehicle-system settings also takes time." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Interior enhancements include plenty of shiny aluminum inserts and optional wood trim. Notably, the air vents are made from aluminum and the pedals from stainless steel, giving the SUV a slightly more exotic look inside. The 195 mph speedometer also contributes to this feel." -- Left Lane News
  • "Instead of another overcomplicated German nightmare, the Audi system is as close to intuitive as cursor-and-mouse automotive controls get." -- The New York Times
  • "The DVD-controlled navigation system is a gem, rendering Rand McNally superfluous." -- Automobile Magazine

Cargo

Most reviewers felt the rear of the Q7 is better utilized for hauling cargo than people. With the second- and third-row seats folded flat, it provides 72.5 cubic feet of cargo space.

  • "But with the second and third rows folded flat, the 2009 Audi Q7 boasts 88 cubic feet of cargo space, which is on par with other crossovers in its class." -- Edmunds
  • "Audi lists 11 cu ft behind 3rd-row seat, 42 with it stowed, 72.5 with all rear seats down. The last figure is mediocre for this class, and is explained by the high cargo floor and low roofline. Still, the load floor is flat with any seats folded, and the headrests don't need removing." -- Consumer Guide
  • "If you regularly carry more than four adults, you still need an R-Class, but if you're more likely to spend weekends poking around antique shops, your Q-ship has come in. The rear seats all fold flat, but even with all three rows up, there's an impressive 10.9 cubic feet of space in the cargo bay." -- Motor Trend
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product