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#8

in 2011 Upscale Midsize Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $14,300 - $15,746
Original MSRP: $26,360 - $28,860
MPG: 19 City / 30 Hwy
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2011 Buick Regal Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Reviewers compare the interior of the 2011 Buick Regal to interiors from Audi and Acura -- which is very high praise. Highlights include a sophisticated dash layout and easy-to-use interior features.  The seats are comfortable, though a few reviewers wish they had more bolstering. Several reviewers happily report that the cabin is extremely quiet, even at speed. Overall reviewers agree that the Regal offers a stylish, comfortable and well-built interior. 

  • "'This car's so quiet I'm falling asleep.' That sentence has probably been uttered in a Buick before. But not in a Buick cruising along a German autobahn. At 130 mph." -- Motor Trend
  • "In my quick inspection, I found not a single hard, hollow-sounding plastic panel. The tilt and telescope steering wheel allowed for a good ergonomic driving position. The only thing seemingly out of place on the car was the Buick emblem, particularly when you're driving the turbo with the 6-speed manual." -- Road and Track
  • "You can see how hard GM is trying the instant you get behind the wheel. The layout is tidy, and could be from any one of several European manufacturers. Flowing organic shapes and soft-touch moldings surround you, and the instruments are big, unambiguous dials with a clear information panel between them." -- Popular Mechanics
  • "Overall, the materials are well-done, and the two interior color choices -- black or two-tone beige and brown -- are sporty and sophisticated, respectively." -- Cars.com
  • "The Regal's interior is similarly full of win. It's easy to find a comfortable seating position, visibility is quite good and the dashboard is attractive, modern and generally well laid-out." -- Autoblog

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Seating

Reviews are generally positive on the seating in the Regal, with critics saying the seats are firm without being punishing. However, a few complain that the seats could use more bolstering to hold people in place during sporty driving. The backseat also gets good marks, though a few reviewers say that it's best suited for two, not three, adults; typical for the class.

A review of the Regal's seats can be seen by watching our Regal video.

  • "The seats, though nicely upholstered and softer than what you'd find in an Audi, prove comfortable, if not completely supportive, for spirited driving. And it's great to find the same degree of power adjustability on the passenger's seat as on the driver's." -- Popular Mechanics
  • "The seats are very comfortable and supportive, though, and the back seat is reasonably roomy." -- Automobile Magazine
  • "The 2011 Buick Regal's seating is comfortable but without that over-stuffed living room feel of Buick's past.  The rear is a bit cramped for headroom, reflecting the realities of a coupe-like curve to the roofline." -- The Detroit Bureau
  • "The build quality of the interior is on-par with modern VW's, the seats even look and feel like something out of Germany: firm, supportive, well bolstered and extraordinarily comfortable, they even have extending thigh supports." -- Jalopnik
  • "The front seats are the same as those in the LaCrosse, which means they are very comfortable. However, the seats in the more sporting Regal are a bit wide and drivers may find them somewhat lacking in lateral support when they hit the twisty stuff." -- Autoblog
  • "The backseat was surprisingly spacious in legroom. It has 3 more inches of it than the TSX, and it's noticeable. At 5-foot-10, though, headroom was tight back there; it has slightly less space in that category than the TSX." -- Cars.com
  • "The Regal is reasonably commodious, too, with 97 cubic feet of passenger space allied to a 14-cubic-foot trunk. The rear seat doesn't feel as accommodating as, say, an Accord's, although the quoted legroom of 37.3 inches is a hair better than the Honda's and nearly two inches better than an Audi A4's." -- Car and Driver

Interior Features

At the Regal's launch, the only available model is the upscale CXL trim.  Standard features on the CXL include a seven-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3 stereo with auxiliary input jack and USB port. Bluetooth and satellite radio are also standard, as are power front seats. Optional features on the Regal include a navigation system. Note that the CX and CXS trims will likely have fewer standard features when they hit dealer lots.

Reviewers are impressed with the interior features on the Regal. While a few say that the center stack has too many buttons, others argue that the controls are easy to learn. Most reviewers agree that the features work well and the materials used in the interior are high-quality. The design is attractive, and many reviewers comment on the high-build quality and exceptionally quiet cabin.

More information about the Regal's interior features can be found by watching our Regal video.

  • "But close the windows and it's easy to have a conversation at 70 mph. Nobody to talk to? Turn up the optional Harman-Kardon audio system and plug into the USB jack, or go wireless with Bluetooth. All the usual technology is available, as are heated seats. It has been a long time since such a thick-rimmed leather steering wheel has graced a Buick." -- Road and Track
  • "The center stack is, at least at first, a bit overwhelming, but quickly becomes easy and intuitive to operate, with a large and useful (optional) navigation screen anchoring the package." -- The Detroit Bureau
  • "The car comes with all the latest gadgets like Bluetooth, satellite radio, navigation, and other widgets people seem to like. The gauges are clear and communicative and the info center works without complaint." -- Jalopnik
  • "The LaCrosse gets a broad, flat dashboard with a floating gauge pod and center cluster. The Regal's design has more of a dual cockpit layout with a driver-oriented layout. Thus, the Regal has a cozier feel although its interior volume is comparable to the LaCrosse. The materials have a high quality feel and fit and finish was consistently excellent across all of the cars that we sampled." -- Autoblog
  • "The vehicles I tested were also equipped with an optional navigation and entertainment system that's available in the most expensive option package, bringing the total price to $30,280, before destination. That beats the Acura, which starts at $29,310 with similar standard features and $32,410 with navigation." -- Cars.com

Cargo

The Regal has 14.2 cubic feet of trunk space, which is average for the class. If you need more trunk space, you can fold down the backseats, or check out cars like the Hyundai Sonata. The Sonata has 2.2 more cubic feet of trunk space and starts at nearly $7,000 less than the Regal.

A few reviewers say that the Regal is lacking small-item storage in the passenger cabin.  However, they also say that the lack of storage space is in service to the cabin's pleasing design -- and that the sacrifice is worth it.

To see how the Regal handles cargo, be sure to check out our Regal video.

  • "The entire layout is sculptural and quite handsome, though like the Buick LaCrosse, the sculpture results in storage that's somewhat lacking. While we couldn't find a good place to put our camera and notepad, it didn't matter, just look at the thing, it's gorgeous." -- Jalopnik
  • "At 14.2 cubic feet, the trunk is plenty large enough without having to fold the 60/40-split rear seats flat. I like how the trunk flings open at the touch of a button; no heavy lifting here. It could easily accommodate a few golf bags -- even though the company has divested itself of all its golf marketing." -- Cars.com

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