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#4

in 2011 Affordable Midsize SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $19,719 - $31,475
Original MSRP: $29,195 - $44,020
MPG: 16 City / 23 Hwy
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2011 Dodge Durango Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

For the most part, reviewers say that the interior of the 2011 Dodge Durango is a pleasant place. The materials are much nicer than the ones used in the old Durango, and overall, they say the interior is on par with competitors. A few reviewers even say that the Durango has a more comfortable interior than competition like the Ford Explorer.

  • "Indeed, the Durango's interior is now noticeably nicer than what most rivals offer." -- Edmunds
  • "If there's any place the old Durango needed polishing, it was inside the cabin. That's why it's been completely redesigned with higher-quality materials, tighter panel gaps, and fewer seams. The result is impressive, with comfortable seats, good visibility, improved ergonomics, and a vastly improved Garmin-based navigation system." -- Motor Trend
  • "Dodge has spared no expense getting the Durango's interior to shine. No matter where any of its seven passengers are sitting, they will be treated to supportive seats, yards of elegant materials and soft-touch surfaces, and about one of the quietest SUV cabins we've tested." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "The design is tastefully understated, with a look that should hold up well over time." -- Cars.com
  • "Materials are similarly classy, with soft materials and hand-stitched surfaces abounding. Even the handful of hard plastics are chiseled from premium milk jugs." --  Left Lane News

 

Seating

The 2011 Dodge Durango seats seven. In the driver’s seat, reviewers appreciate good support and a commanding outward view. The second row isn’t adjustable, but reviewers say there is plenty of space. What test drivers can’t agree about is the third row. Some say it’s comfortable enough for adults, while others say it’s smaller than the third row in the Ford Explorer. Still, others say that the Durango has the bigger third row. If third row space is important to you, check out the Durango’s third row to make sure it suits your needs.

  • "Headroom and legroom are ample, and the seats are long-haul comfortable. Crew and Citadel have a power tilt and telescopic steering wheel, which is an unexpected (and welcome) convenience feature. Entry and exit are a bit high for a crossover, but they're not excessive. Visibility is generally good, though tall rear headrests obstruct the view directly to the rear." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The front seats are roomy and comfortable, but the second row has a rather flat cushion and doesn't offer quite as much legroom as roomier rivals. The Durango's easily accessed third row offers more room than a Chevy Tahoe's but is still best for a pair of kids." -- Edmunds
  • "Full-size adults (and their feet) can fit comfortably in the Durango's way back. Not so much in the Explorer, especially in the foot room department. You're also left wondering where the Explorer's extra width has gone. The cabin doesn't seem especially roomy, though there is a lot of space between the steering wheel and the door, for whatever that's worth. Put another way, the Ford's width gives it no discernable interior space advantage over the Dodge." -- Motor Trend
  • "The second row, too, feels rather Grand Cherokee-esque. There’s no shortage of leg room and an easy-fold system drops the adjustable bench for access to row three." -- Left Lane News

Interior Features

Reviewers say the list of standard and optional features on the Durango is comprehensive. The base Durango Express comes with standard features like remote start and three-zone climate control that usually cost extra on other affordable SUVs. If you upgrade to the Crew model (which adds about $4,000 to the price of the Durango) you get 28 GB infotainment system that lets you store music files directly on the stereo-- that means no more forgetting your iPod. The Crew also has a touchscreen to control infotainment functions, keyless entry and start and a power liftgate. For $5,000, you can add the CrewLux package which adds navigation, leather seats, and heated seats for the first two rows. Or, for about $12,000 more than the base Durango, you can get the Citadel trim, which has all the standards of the lower trims, but adds nicer leather, cooled front seats, blind spot alert, park assist and adaptive cruise control. A rear-seat DVD system is optional on Crew and Citadel trims.

For the most part, reviewers say the interior features work well, though a few complain that the graphics on the optional navigation system look out-of-date. Also, the 2011 Ford Explorer has optional features like SYNC and MyFord Touch that reviewers are much more enthusiastic about. A 2011 Explorer with SYNC and MyFord costs a few hundred dollars less than a similarly-equipped Durango Crew model.

  • "The climate controls are plainly marked and simple to operate. The audio controls suffer some undue complication when paired with Chrysler's Uconnect multi-media interface. The navigation system shifts to a Garmin-brand interface, which works well." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Chrysler's latest batch of digital entertainment options (a 28GB hard drive, satellite radio and TV) should appeal to kids and tech-savvy parents.” -- Edmunds
  • "One gripe: We wish Dodge would have also banished the nasty-looking last-gen navigation screen from its model lineup. Obviously, the fantastic-looking Garmin-based system found in the Charger and Journey will eventually filter down to the Durango, but it's a pity it's not here now." -- Motor Trend

Cargo

The 2011 Dodge Durango has 17.2 cubic feet of cargo space behind the third row – enough for a few grocery bags, but not much else. Fold the third row seats, and the Durango has 47.7 cubic feet of cargo space, which is enough for several large suitcases. The second row also folds, for a maximum cargo capacity of 84.5 cubic feet. That’s more than the total amount of cargo space offered in the Ford Explorer, but reviewers complain that the Durango has a higher load deck, and like the Explorer, has optional power-folding third-row seats. If you need a lot more space, check out the Chevrolet Traverse or GMC Acadia, which have 116.4 and 116.9 cubic feet of total cargo space, respectively.

Though a few reviewers complain about the load height on the Durango, most like the small storage spaces throughout the cabin, which make it easy to stash cell phones, toys and snacks.

  • "Decent space behind the 3rd row becomes generous as the rear seat backs are folded. The load deck is on the high side, which can hinder loading bulky items. Interior storage consists of a two-tier center console, a small glovebox, and a few other exposed storage spaces. The bottle holders in the front doors are angled, which makes access easy, but that makes full containers more likely to spill." -- Consumer Guide
  • "With 28 possible configurations, the Durango's interior is more than capable of carrying any manner of cargo or crew. Clever features, such as the remote folding rear seat head restraints improve rearward visibility, as does the available rear back-up camera. With 84.5 cubic feet of cargo space, the Durango's interior is about equal in size to the Honda Pilot, but smaller than the 116.9 cubic feet offered in the GMC Acadia." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • “You have to clear a tall rear bumper when loading luggage, but the third row folds easily into the floor to expand the cargo area to 47.7 cubic feet." -- Cars.com
  • “A 50/50-folding third row offers plenty of room for kids and includes convenient power-folding headrests at the press of a dash-mounted button. If only the seats themselves folded electronically; they’re not tough to manually stow, but many rivals offer mom-friendly push-button stowage." -- Left Lane News

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