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#8

in 2012 Affordable Midsize SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $18,869 - $30,277
Original MSRP: $27,770 - $38,960
MPG: 19 City / 27 Hwy
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2012 Ford Edge Performance

This performance review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Reviewers are happy with the way the Ford Edge drives, although they say it won’t give enthusiasts goose bumps. They say it’s comfortable to drive and that all of its engines are plenty powerful. Plus, the auto press thinks its new Ecoboost engine is worth the extra $1,000.

  • "The Edge feels like it hasn't given up any driving performance in the switch to four-cylinder power. With its readily-accessible torque and even higher 30 mpg, paying an extra $995 for the Edge EcoBoost is a comparative no-brainer.” -- Autoblog
  • "If you don’t plan to hitch a trailer or go off-roading, the tiny EcoBoost has potential - especially in the Edge.” -- Cars.com
  • "Again in the Edge, the turbo four can't match the quickness of the V-6. Where Ford measures the V-6's 0-60 time at sprightly 7.3 seconds, it clocks the turbo four at a more sedate 8.8 seconds. But the Edge Ecoboost does not feel sluggish, and the turbo four's throttle response and sound quality do an excellent job imitating the dynamic character of a V-6.” -- Automobile Magazine
  • “What remains to be seen, though, is if Ford’s promised fuel-economy numbers can be achieved in real-world driving. We have our doubts that they can - Ford’s blown V-6 hasn’t really delivered on its efficiency promises - but there’s no doubt that the EcoBoost four will satisfy otherwise.” -- Car and Driver

Acceleration and Power

The 2012 Edge comes with a 3.5-liter V6 engine that makes 285 horsepower. It's paired with a six-speed automatic transmission. SEL and Limited models get a SelectShift Automatic with manual shifting mode. Sport models come with a 3.7-liter V6 engine that makes 305 horsepower. It’s paired with the six-speed SelectShift Automatic transmission with paddle shifters.

For 2012, Ford adds its 2.0-liter Ecoboost four-cylinder engine to the Edge’s lineup, and reviewers say it’s capable for such a tiny engine. They say that even though it can’t be had with all-wheel drive and reduces towing capability, it’s well worth the $1,000 premium because it dramatically improves fuel economy without sacrificing much acceleration or power. The Ecoboost engine is not available on Sport models, but it’s available on SE, SEL and Limited trims.

The EPA has not yet rated the 2012 Ford Edge. However, it rates the 2011 front-wheel drive Edge at 19/27 mpg city/highway with the base 3.5-liter V6 engine and six-speed automatic transmission, while similarly-configured all-wheel drive models get 19/26 mpg city/highway. Sport models with all-wheel drive, a paddle-shifted six-speed automated manual transmission and 3.7-liter V6 earn 17/23 mpg city/highway, while front-wheel drive Sport models get 18/25 mpg city/highway. Ford estimates that the Edge with an Ecoboost engine and front-wheel drive will get 21/30 mpg city/highway.

  • "With three adults aboard, the EcoBoost Edge proved itself capable from a standing start, punchy as revs climbed. The six-speed automatic can wander on upshifts, but it kicks down multiple gears swiftly. All in all, the EcoBoost suits the Edge well, and for the extra $995 over a front-drive V-6 model - a quicker car, but not by much - it should sell itself.” -- Cars.com
  • "Again in the Edge, the turbo four can't match the quickness of the V-6. Where Ford measures the V-6's 0-60 time at sprightly 7.3 seconds, it clocks the turbo four at a more sedate 8.8 seconds. But the Edge Ecoboost does not feel sluggish, and the turbo four's throttle response and sound quality do an excellent job imitating the dynamic character of a V-6.” -- Automobile Magazine
  • "The V6 engines are audible under acceleration, but they quiet down nicely at cruise. At highway speed, a bit of wind noise and road rumble are heard, but neither is bothersome.” -- Consumer Guide
  • "Very light throttle (in the Sport model) brought on smooth acceleration. This is an indication of good powertrain electronics programming. Conversely, dropping the hammer made the Edge launch with authority." -- Autoblog

Handling and Braking

Reviewers say that the Edge handles well for a crossover, but watch out for the Sport model. Its bigger 22-inch wheels tend to decrease maneuverability and transmit more of the road’s bumps into the cabin.

  • "I thought the Edge handled very well on a variety of road surfaces-highway, rough secondary roads, and unpaved rural routes. There's also plenty of smooth and accessible power and the steering is excellent.” -- Automobile Magazine
  • "Edge's steering is well weighted and accurate with no need for excessive correction, even with Sport's bigger tires. Body motion and cornering lean are well controlled for an SUV, but it never quite manages to feel sporty. Still, Edge's road manners are pleasant.” -- Consumer Guide
  • “The steering remains heavy, but at least some feedback is now part of the picture, thanks to revised steering gear with less friction. The brakes, too, have been upgraded with new pistons, larger rear discs, and new pads adding some bite as the pedal is depressed, although we would love a bit more.” – Car and Driver
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product