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#18

in 2011 Affordable Compact SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $18,750 - $20,716
Original MSRP: $32,320 - $34,830
MPG: 30 City / 27 Hwy
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2011 Ford Escape Hybrid Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

While reviewers like the 2011 Ford Escape Hybrid’s high-tech features and options, several mention that the interior design is starting to look dated.

  • "Disappointing overall. Escape's interior imparts a low-buck atmosphere with lots of hard-plastic trim and odd panel textures. Several test examples exhibited disappointing panel gaps and generally uneven fit and finish."--Consumer Guide
  • "An upright dash, firm seats and clever features like available ambient lighting create a much more contemporary demeanor, but the overall feeling still seems a bit dated when compared with newer compact SUV offerings." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "The interior of the Escape I tested featured nice check-pattern cloth upholstery and acceptable materials throughout." -- Detroit Free Press
  • "The dash has appealing textures, bright gauges and an eye-level center window that displays radio functions, ambient temperature and climate-control readouts." -- Kansas City Star
  • "The styling inside the Ford Escape has received some modifications as well to bring it more in-line with the current, contemporary European Feel rather than what was hailed by consumers, as an ancient- clunky style of decor for previous years." -- Automobile.com

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Seating                       

The Escape Hybrid seats five -- and reviewers have few complaints about comfort and spaciousness, though several complain about the lack of a telescoping steering wheel. They also don’t like the fact that the rear seats don't slide, which makes the Escape Hybrid much less versatile than most compact SUVs, including the less expensive GMC Terrain (by about $5,000). A plus for environment lovers is that the hybrid's seating fabric is constructed of recycled material. Cloth seats are standard for the base model, while the Limited upgrades to leather and heated front seats.

  • "The front seats are liable to make some folks feel like they're sitting too high up and the lack of a telescoping steering column might make it more difficult for some drivers to get comfortable.” -- Edmunds
  • "The vehicle lacks useful details such as sliding rear seats, as you get in the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4. The sliding seats in those models gives them 3 inches more rear legroom -- important if you tote teens or adults back there." -- USA Today
  • Knee and foot space are ample, aided by a flat floor. Three adults will fit for short trips on the nicely shaped rear bench. Entry and exit are hampered a bit by narrow door openings." -- Consumer Guide

Interior Features

The Escape Hybrid comes with many standard upscale features, including dual-zone electronic automatic temperature control, a leather-wrapped steering wheel with cruise and audio controls, and a compass and outside temperature display. Base models even come standard with Ford's well-liked SYNC multimedia system. In addition, they get Ford's new MyKey standard. This system is a great tool for parents who want to limit how their teens drive.

  • "One highlight that may well make you forget about these negatives is Ford's voice-operated Sync system that lets you control your cell phone and MP3 player with simple spoken commands. The available navigation system's Sirius Travel Link service is equally handy, with its ability to provide all kinds of useful information including gas prices at nearby stations, live weather radar images, movie theater show times and more." -- Edmunds
  • "MyKey is a major downer for new teen drivers, but it offers parents piece of mind with the ability to limit the top speed, encourage seat belt usage, and set earlier low fuel warnings." -- Automobile Magazine
  • "The climate controls are simple to use. The navigation system absorbs most audio controls. It complicates some functions by requiring multiple button and/or touch-screen presses for some simple tasks. Redundant steering-wheel buttons and voice programming via Ford's Sync system help." -- Consumer Guide

Cargo

The Escape Hybrid provides 66.4 cubic feet of space with the second row folded and 30.9 cubic feet with all seats up -- not as much as the Honda CR-V or Toyota RAV4 and even slightly less than the gasoline-powered Escape. However, the hybrid's cargo figures are still about average for its class.

One drawback for the Escape Hybrid is that folding the rear seats down can be a difficult multi-step process. In addition, the rear seat doesn’t slide back and forth to increase cargo space like it does on the less expensive GMC Terrain.

  • "Speaking of those 60/40-split rear seatbacks, there's 28 cubic feet of storage with them up and 66 cubic feet of cargo capacity with them folded down. Folding the seatback down is cumbersome as it requires the headrests to be removed and the bottom cushions to be tumbled forward, a consequence of offering a flat load floor." -- Edmunds
  • "A low, level load deck and opening tailgate glass make for handy cargo loading and hauling. The rear seat backs do fold flat, but require multiple, inconvenient steps to do so. In-cabin small-item storage includes several bins and cubbies. All 4 doors have map pockets as well." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The big opening to the Escape's cargo space makes it easy to get loads in and out of the SUV." -- Detroit Free Press

Next Steps: 2011 Ford Escape Hybrid

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