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Avg. Price Paid:$14,124 - $17,123
Original MSRP: $25,400 - $31,320
MPG: 14 City / 20 Hwy
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2008 Ford Explorer Sport Trac Interior

This interior review was written when the 2008 Ford Explorer Sport Trac was new.

Although the 2008 Explorer Sport Trac's interior is "the highlight of this ride," for AutoWeek, it doesn't best the luxurious cabins of the Cadillac Escalade EXT or the Honda Ridgeline.

But Kelley Blue Book says, "On balance, the Sport Trac's interior accommodations and cargo versatility are so appealing that every new owner will probably just love the thing."

Seating

According to NewCars.com, the Sport Trac "offers more head- and leg-room to passengers than the average compact crew cab truck does." But reviewers' opinions on space and comfort vary widely. Kelley Blue Book says the overall seating is "quite roomy and comfortable, in both the front and rear, and a long day behind the wheel should prove pleasant." Others also compliment the two front bucket seats, which "were comfortable and easy to adjust," says the Kansas City Star.

One major complaint is the poorly designed door handles, which are located on a large armrest on each door panel. "Unfortunately, the locations of the door grips and door releases are awkward to use every time you exit the car or climb in and shut the door," says Autoweb. Several reviewers point out that Ford plans to redesign the door panels for a future model. Cars.com writes: "The floor seems too high, or the seats too low, making for an awkward driving position. I could never get the power seats to be comfortable, and I adjusted them every time I got in the truck."

Of the three rear seats, USA Today says they "won't win any comfort awards." However, according to Edmunds, Ford claims the Sport Trac has more rear leg room (36.8 inches) than any other truck in its class. Cars.com notes the rear bench is fine for children and shorter people, but "doesn't offer as much comfort for adults. Occupants in the outer seats have plenty of foot room and a backrest that's nicely angled, but there's little legroom to spare and the low seat cushion makes for a knees-up seating position." And New Car Test Drive says the bottom cushions in both the front and rear could provide more thigh support.

Interior Features

Autoweb says the base XLT model comes "well equipped with a nice array of standard features." These include power windows, mirrors and door locks, keyless entry, tilt steering, cruise control, air conditioning and an AM/FM single CD/MP3 player. Motor Week says the Sport Trac is "a long way from a bare bones sport machine, especially in Limited trim with a long list of standards." Upgrading to the Limited adds a power driver's seat and a leather-wrapped steering wheel and gearshift knob, among other conveniences.

The Sacramento Bee writes, "You really want to make sure you get the Sport Trac you want." The reviewer notes the upscale Limited model is "likely the choice of buyers who want more luxury SUV than hard-working pickup in their Sport Trac," and the base XLT is the "likely choice of a buyer who does a lot of do-it-yourself hauling on weekends but doesn't drive a pickup to a work site on weekdays." 4x4REVIEW.com notes that "with an options list as long as your arm you can order up a Sport Track that fits your lifestyle."

Stereo and Entertainment

The Sport Trac's base stereo comes with a single-disc CD player with MP3 compatibility and an audio input jack. Buyers can upgrade to an Audiophile system that boasts a six-disc in-dash CD/MP3 player with an eight-inch subwoofer and 190-watt amplifier. AutoWeek notes, "The audio system is pretty good, though the eight-inch subwoofer leaves a bit to be desired." SIRIUS satellite radio is also available.

For 2008, Ford offers its new Sync multimedia infotainment system as a Sport Trac option. Sync is a voice-activated in-car communication system for both a mobile phone and digital music player.

Navigation

Reviewers like the Sport Trac's optional navigation system, which Cars.com says "works well, and its touch-screen interface is easy to operate." However, the reviewer adds, "it's time Ford upgraded to a system with better voice technology -- the computerized voice continually mangled the pronunciation of street names." The Auto Channel, however, appreciates that the system displays and announces the current road name.

Cargo

NewCars.com reports the Sport Trac will "certainly prove friendlier than the average compact crew cab truck for those of you with frequent child-cargo." However, the 44.4 inches of interior cargo space (behind the front seat with the rear seats folded) may be adequate, but it's not ideal according to most. Cars.com notes that with all the seats in use, "there's not a lot of luggage room in the cabin, so bags will likely end up in the cargo box when there's a full load of people onboard."

The Sport Trac's rear seatbacks are 60/40 so they can fold flat over the seat bottoms to create a flat interior cargo floor. Cars.com continues, "Folding the cleverly engineered seats is straightforward -- pull one lever and the backrest folds down as the seat cushion slides forward to allow the seatback to fold flatter." Note that folding the rear seats flat doesn't result in an extended cargo bed like it does in similar vehicles.

MSN is happy with interior storage space, noting, "There is a deep front covered storage bin, and front cup holders are positioned to avoid spills. Rear occupants also get large dual cup holders." However, Autoweb says practical storage space is lacking: "For a vehicle designed for such an active lifestyle that the owner can't decide between a pickup or an SUV, all the Sport Trac provides for interior storage are decent door bins, an average glove box, an adequate center bin with coin slots and a tissue holder, and dual rear magazine pockets."

Review Last Updated: 3/11/09

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