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#14

in 2012 Affordable Midsize SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $23,621 - $37,598
Original MSRP: $32,835 - $46,810
MPG: 17 City / 24 Hwy
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2012 GMC Acadia Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Reviewers say the 2012 GMC Acadia’s interior is upscale, comfortable and roomy. They say it’s a good value for the price, although the Denali model might not be worth the extra money. Plus, critics are happy that the third row is spacious enough for adults, though not for long rides.

  • "See, it's OK to look mean, as long as you're not hostile to the occupants. The Acadia Denali caters to them in nearly every way possible.” -- The Detroit News
  • "In total, the Acadia is a far more practical vehicle for people and cargo than the bigger GMC Yukon.” -- Edmunds
  • "Though there are few padded surfaces, bright accents and richly grained plastics give the interior an inviting look. Denalis look little more special than other Acadia models, which is disappointing given their large price premium. Build quality has been good, but one test model suffered from a rattle in the rear seating area.” -- Consumer Guide
  • "Cars.com's Mike Hanley got an early look at the Acadia Denali and thought it was nice, but didn't see any real improvement in interior feel to a regular Acadia with a black interior. He did say it was ‘certainly flashy.’” -- Cars.com
  • "When all is said and done, the interior of the … Acadia is nice and luxurious, but the material quality is somewhat lacking. Low-grade plastics and unimpressive assembly methods are a drain on the otherwise impeccable quality." -- Automobile.com

Seating

The base 2012 GMC Acadia comes with seating for eight, though seven-passenger seating with second-row captain’s chairs is a no-cost option on all but the base SL trim. The Acadia includes LATCH child seat connectors in second-row outboard seating positions. Reviewers don’t say much about the front row, but they’re surprised at how easy it is to get to the third row. Once they’re there, the automotive press says the third row is one of the roomiest in the class. Though adults won’t want to be there for long, at least they can fit in the third row, which can be a hostile environment for taller occupants in many other three-row crossovers.

  • "And while the Acadia Denali looks big, it remains very easy to enter and exit, even if you're climbing into the third row; the second-row captain's chairs fold up smartly with a simple pull of a lever." -- The Detroit News
  • "The third-row seats in the Acadia are roomy and bolstering on the seat backs makes extended journeys comfortable. Access to the rear seats is easy thanks to a clever mechanism that slides the second-row seats out of the way." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "The first- and second-row seats are quite comfortable and supportive, and the split-folding third-row seat - which is often a kids-only zone in traditional SUVs - can accommodate adults in reasonable comfort." -- Edmunds
  • "Third-row roominess is decent for its class." -- Automobile.com
  • "With the 2nd row slid forward, the 3rd row can accommodate 6 footers - though they'll ride knees-up. Foot space can be tight in either row.” -- Consumer Guide

Interior Features

The $32,605 GMC Acadia SL comes well-equipped for its class, with standard features like an MP3-compatible, eight-speaker CD player and radio, keyless entry, a three-month complimentary subscription to satellite radio, chrome interior trim and cruise control.

The SLE trim costs about $35,000 and adds power-adjustable front seats, Bluetooth, an inside rearview auto-dimming mirror and remote vehicle start. The Acadia SLT1 starts at about $38,800 and comes standard with features like automatic tri-zone climate control, a Bose premium 10-speaker audio system, heated front seats and leather-appointed first- and second-row seats.

The top-of-the-line Acadia SLT2 rounds out the Acadia lineup at about $39,700. It comes standard with features like an eight-way power driver’s seat with two memory positions, as well as the option to add the $1,000 technology package, which includes rear audio controls and a head-up display that projects information like directions and current speed onto the windshield.

The luxurious Acadia Denali causes the price to skyrocket to almost $43,900, which is about $10,800 more than the base Acadia SL. It includes heated and cooled front seats, a head-up display, two-panel power sunroof, leather-wrapped steering wheel with wood accents and special sound-dampening materials, which are all standard.

The GMC Acadia starts about $3,200 more than its corporate twin, the Chevrolet Traverse, but reviewers say it’s worth the money. Its list of standard features outshines the Traverse, and the Denali trim is more luxurious than nearly anything else in its price range.

  • “Day or night, Acadia's luminous gauges are easy to read. The optional head-up display projects vehicle speed and other readings on the windshield. The audio controls are easy to reach. The optional navigation system absorbs most audio functions but doesn't complicate their use. Climate controls are mounted lower but within easy reach, though their push buttons are less convenient than rotary knobs.” -- Consumer Guide
  • "While priced at the high end of the segment, the Acadia's generous standard equipment list must be taken into consideration.” -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Two other downsides include small and indistinct buttons for the audio and climate controls, and outward visibility that's more compromised than that of other competing vehicles.” -- Edmunds

Cargo

Reviewers are impressed with the amount of cargo space the midsize Acadia offers. With all three rows of seats in use, Acadia drivers still have 24.1 cubic feet of cargo space to work with. That number expands to 68.7 cubic feet of space with the second row in use and the third row seat removed, and an enormous 115.9 cubic feet of cargo room with only the front seats in use, the second row folded and the third-row seat and cargo management system removed. Few competitors can boast so much space. The Dodge Durango can hold a respectable 84.5 cubic feet with the second and third rows stowed, which is good for the class, but is 31.4 cubic feet less than the GMC Acadia’s capacity.

  • "Acadia's cargo volume is the largest among midsize SUVs, rivaling that of many large SUVs. There's more usable space behind the raised 3rd-row seat than in most midsize SUVs, plus an underfloor bin. Both the 2nd- and 3rd-row seats fold forward easily to form a flat, nearly level surface. An optional power tailgate is a handy feature. Several bins and cubbies provide good interior storage.” -- Consumer Guide
  • "The interior's usability is enhanced with numerous cup holders, storage spaces and additional storage beneath the rear cargo area." -- Kelley Blue Book

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