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#2

in 2011 Affordable Compact SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $17,490 - $21,493
Original MSRP: $24,500 - $31,650
MPG: 22 City / 32 Hwy
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2011 GMC Terrain Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Most reviewers give high marks to the Terrain's quality cabin, which is especially quiet, spacious and stylish. Test drivers even find the rear seats roomy, which is quite a compliment for a compact SUV and makes the Terrain a good choice for families.

  • “The Terrain's grown-up feel isn't just literal, however. Its designers went out of their way to make the cabin visually interesting in a segment where stark utility has generally reigned supreme." -- Edmunds
  • "Almost everything above knee level has been improved,' explains interior designer Jason Diehl, who points out deeper grain finishes on the dash, higher quality materials, and improved panel tolerances during our test drive through suburban Michigan." -- Popular Mechanics

Seating

Reviewers find the Terrain's front seats to be comfortable but are thrilled to find that its rear seats are also especially comfortable and roomy, which is a rare find within the compact SUV class. Rear space is aided by the manually sliding rear seat, which allows passengers to adjust legroom. This is something that isn’t offered on all SUVs. However, note that the rear seat takes some work to move and you have to be sitting in it to do it.

The base model comes with cloth seats, while the SLT comes with perforated leather and heated front seats.

  • "In terms of accommodations, the Terrain (and its Equinox sibling) boasts the most welcoming backseat in the class thanks to a rear bench that both reclines and slides." --Edmunds
  • "We found the perforated leather seats on the SLT variants to be comfortable and well-situated within the Terrain's interior..." -- Popular Mechanics
  • "Seats are shared between both models, with the excellent mid-level cloth seats again taking the cake for comfort, grip, and styling. Rear seat passengers enjoy limo-like leg room with the sliding rear seat in he back position, and the bench is plenty comfortable for even the longest trips." -- Jalopnik
  • "I rode in the backseat with a driver who measures a towering 6 feet 6 inches tall, and he had a bit of headroom to spare even with an optional moonroof, a feature that tends to rob at least a little interior space. Thanks to a rear bench seat that slides back, I had a few inches of knee clearance, even with the front seat moved fully rearward." -- Kicking Tires

Interior Features

The Terrain is very well-equipped for such an affordable vehicle and for its class. The controls are also quite intuitive and won't even require you to pore over the owner's manual. The base model comes standard a rearview camera, remote keyless entry, a tilt and telescopic steering column, an iPod interface (with USB port) and XM Satellite Radio. For more upscale features, you may want to upgrade to the SLE-2, a higher trim of the base model, which adds automatic climate control, Bluetooth phone connectivity and a leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio and cruise controls.

The price difference between the two trims is just over $1,500, which may be worth it considering that you have to upgrade to the SLE-2 to get many of the Terrain's extra-cost options, which include heated front seats, remote vehicle start, a power sunroof an audio system with navigation, and a rear-seat DVD entertainment system.

The DVD system is particularly impressive for an affordable SUV. It comes with a dual seatback display and can play two DVDs at a time. It also comes with two wireless headsets.

  • "The GMC Terrain's cabin is remarkably stylish, particularly by the standards of this typically utilitarian segment. The slick-looking dashboard design is reminiscent of the related Cadillac SRX, and the Terrain's high-tech navigation and entertainment options only heighten its appeal." -- Edmunds
  • "GMC added soft red interior lighting that becomes the inside nighttime chrome, putting the Terrain ahead of its competitors. For anyone test-driving small SUVs, I'd recommend a trip at night. Drive the competition at night and then the Terrain and see if you don't agree." -- Detroit News
  • "The LCD is a little bit of a reach, so most people will go for the multidirectional button, although that can be little tedious, especially when entering letters from the onscreen keyboard." -- CNET

Cargo

The Terrain provides 31.6 cubic feet of cargo space with all seats in use and 63.9 with the second row folded down. This is about 10 cubic feet less than the Honda CR-V and Toyota RAV4 offer. If you’re looking for more cargo space, you can choose of those vehicles and save around $3,000.

While the Terrain’s cargo space is about average for a compact SUV, some reviewers complain that the rear seats don't fold completely flat.

  • "The one beef here is that the rear seat doesn't fold completely flat, primarily because the designers chose to use bolsters on the sides and cushion for better passenger comfort." -- Edmunds
  • "The Terrain's interior features a bin between the front seats that's large enough for a laptop, and rear seats that slide up to 8 inches fore and aft." -- Popular Mechanics
  • "An especially handy interior feature the Terrain received from Equinox is a MultiFlex rear seat that slides nearly eight inches fore and aft to trade legroom for cargo space on demand. Unfortunately, the split rear cushions are stuffed to the point they don't fold fully flat when it's time to haul a new big screen home from the mall." -- Automobile Magazine

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Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product