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#1

in 2012 Affordable Large SUVs

Avg. Price Paid: $27,918 - $47,557
Original MSRP: $40,085 - $60,760
MPG: 15 City / 21 Hwy
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2012 GMC Yukon Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

The 2012 GMC Yukon has a comfortable and inviting interior that can fit up to nine people, though test drivers note that passengers won’t all be comfortable. Reviewers say that while build quality is good, some of the materials feel a bit downmarket, even in its more expensive trims.

  • "The GMC Yukon boasts an attractive cabin with high-quality materials. The control layout is simple and straightforward, and the available navigation system is also easy to use despite a smaller screen than newer GM models have." -- Edmunds
  • "The cabin has few soft-touch panels, but materials are generally solid to the touch and assembled with care to create a high-quality ambience, even on SLE versions. Denalis get added dress-up touches, but most of that model's interior panels are still hard plastic.” -- Consumer Guide

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Seating

The 2012 GMC Yukon can seat up to nine people with the optional front row bench seat. The majority of reviewers found the seating available in the first two rows of the GMC Yukon comfortable, but all say the third row is barely adequate for small children. That’s fairly typical for most truck-based SUVs, however. The Yukon comes standard with cloth upholstery, but higher trims come standard with leather-trimmed seats.

  • "Bench or buckets, the front seats are supportive. There's ample headroom and legroom, though the cramped center position on the bench should be for emergency use only.” -- Consumer Guide
  • "Buyers seeking a roomy third row may want to try out the longer Suburban and Yukon XL.” -- Car and Driver
  • "Cramped third row.” -- Cars.com

Interior Features

The 2012 Yukon comes fairly well-equipped in base trims, with standard features including tri-zone automatic climate control, a Bose premium nine-speaker sound system, Bluetooth connectivity and satellite radio. Denali trims are outright luxurious, with standard navigation, an upgraded stereo, additional sound insulation and remote start. A rear-seat entertainment system is optional on all trims. Test drivers note that most of the Yukon’s controls are easy to use, though some can be hard to see.

  • "What We Like: Easy-to-use controls.” -- Cars.com
  • "All gauges are large but some testers find the markings too indistinct for best legibility. Yukon's optional navigation system absorbs, but doesn't complicate, audio functions.” -- Consumer Guide

Cargo

With the third row in place, the 2012 Yukon has a mere 16.9 cubic feet of cargo capacity. Removing the third row seats increase the capacity to 60.3 cubic feet, and folding the second row brings it to 108.9 cubic feet. Yukon XL models offer a far-better cargo capacity of 45.8 cubic feet behind the third row, 90 cubic feet behind the second row and a massive 137.4 cubic feet behind the first row. The only other vehicles that can compete with these numbers are larger minivans like the Toyota Sienna, which can hold up to 150 cubic feet of cargo behind the front seats. A common complaint about the Yukon is that the third row seats don't fold flat into the floor. They must be removed to maximize cargo space, and are very bulky. The Ford Expedition, on the other hand, has third-row seats that fold into the floor. Reviewers overwhelmingly prefer the Expedition’s setup.

  • "There's no abundance of storage room behind the 3rd row. The folded 3rd-row seat backs rest well above the load floor, complicating loading of large items. Those seats unlatch easily, but are heavy and cumbersome to remove.” -- Consumer Guide
  • "That third-row seat also poses problems for cargo capacity, as it doesn't fold away into the floor. You must either fold the seatback down and place your stuff on top or physically remove the heavy seat from the truck.” -- Edmunds