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#9

in 2011 Wagons

Avg. Price Paid: $16,316 - $19,453
Original MSRP: $29,990 - $36,540
MPG: 18 City / 27 Hwy
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2011 Honda Accord Crosstour Performance

This performance review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

The 2011 Honda Accord Crosstour comes with a pleasant, car-like ride and a six-cylinder engine. Fuel economy, while above average, also doesn’t measure up to top competitors. Many reviewers consider the performance boring.

  • "With steering that's not as crisp, as well as a loftier perch and larger tires on 17- or 18-inch wheels, the Crosstour is no Accord sedan on the road. But it is not completely sensory depriving like most crossovers. That's because it is a wagon, and it retains most of the sedan's overall composure." -- Car and Driver
  • “It feels like an Accord sedan (albeit with 300 extra pounds) right down to its accurate steering and predictable handling." -- Edmunds

Acceleration and Power

The Crosstour comes with a V6 engine that makes 271 horsepower and is paired to a five-speed automatic transmission.  Some reviewers appreciate the engine’s ample power -- which beats most competitors, including the more affordable Venza, but others say that given the Crosstour’s weight, the engine is merely adequate.

Unfortunately, the Crosstour’s fuel economy isn’t as impressive as its Toyota rival’s. According to the EPA, the Crosstour gets 18/27 mpg city/highway in 2WD configuration and 18/26 mpg in 4WD. The Venza’s V6 engine has a 19/26 rating.

  • "The V6 provides sufficient power in all driving situations. The transmission shifts smoothly and crisply." -- Consumer Guide
  • “Power output from the V6 is adequate, but the transmission tends to delay driver inputs and hesitates to downshift when passing slower traffic.” -- Edmunds
  • "The Crosstour is a runner right out of the box, with the V6 pulling hard and the transmission snapping off quick shifts. We'd like even more control and the responsiveness of an auto-manual shift mode, but that's not offered." -- AutoWeek
  • “Acceleration comes smoothly enough, though it feels a few protein shakes shy of Toyota's 3.5-liter Venza and a full training regimen short of the Nissan Murano -- really this league's Rocky Balboa." -- Cars.com

Handling and Braking

Reviewers love the Crosstour’s comfortable, sedan-like ride, but a few of them criticize the sluggish brakes.

  • "Accord Crosstours feel solid but lack the European-style composure of previous-generation Accord sedans and even Honda's own Pilot midsize SUV. Large bumps can bring out some unexpected harshness, but it's never bothersome. " -- Consumer Guide
  • "And it's not light; about 300 pounds more than a V-6 Accord to start and an additional couple hundred pounds for all-wheel drive, which overtaxes the CR-V-size brakes under heavy use.” -- Car and Driver
  • "Like the standard Accord, the Crosstour benefits from accurate steering and predictable handling. But its additional 300 pounds and higher center of gravity put a damper on most sporting intentions."-- Edmunds

All-Wheel Drive

Several reviewers say the system makes the car even heavier and doesn’t do much to enhance handling.

  • "Optional on the EX-L, [the all-wheel drive system] adds 183 pounds. I evaluated front- and all-wheel-drive Crosstours, and the extra weight doesn't render a major difference in acceleration." -- Cars.com
  • "The all-wheel-drive system, which delivers power to the front wheels and shifts it rearward (up to a 50/50 split) when traction is low, doesn't seem to enhance the handling; if anything, its extra weight (about 180 lbs) makes the Crosstour feel a tad more slovenly in the corners. Unless you live in snow country, I'd skip it." -- About.com

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