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#9

in Wagons

MSRP: $27,380 - $37,240
Invoice: $25,048 - $34,042
MPG: 20 City / 30 Hwy
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Honda Crosstour Performance

Many reviewers say the 2014 Honda Crosstour has nimble handling and a pleasant overall driving experience compared to other cars in its class.

  • "Although the Crosstour is based on the previous-generation Accord, its ride quality was notably better than that of the sedan. We enjoy the Crosstour's elevated ride height and surprisingly quiet interior for a Honda." -- AutoTrader
  • "When it comes to driving dynamics, the 2014 Honda Crosstour shares some of the Accord's classic strengths: It has accurate steering and surefooted handling for a tall, family-themed hatchback." -- Edmunds
  • "Despite its unconventional looks, the 2013 Honda Crosstour's underpinnings are firmly rooted in the Honda Accord family sedan. On long stretches of open road, the Crosstour possesses the same light and agile driving dynamics as its sedan-equivalent." -- Kelley Blue Book (2013)
  • "While Accord sedans and coupes are on the sporty side of the midsize class, nothing about the Crosstour is especially engaging. This is a competent, somewhat large car, with acceptable road manners." -- Consumer Guide (2011)

Acceleration and Power

The standard engine in the 2014 Honda Crosstour is a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that makes 192 horsepower and is mated to a five-speed automatic transmission. A 278-horsepower, 3.5-liter V6 is optional, and is paired with a six-speed automatic. The four-cylinder model gets an EPA-estimated 22/31 mpg city/highway, which is on-par with the fuel economy of other four-cylinder, gas-powered wagons, but less than what diesel and hybrid competitors like the Volkswagen Jetta SportWagen TDI and the Toyota Prius v get. The six-cylinder model with all-wheel-drive gets 19/28 mpg, which is slightly better than the fuel economy of similarly equipped vehicles in the class.

Reviewers say the four-cylinder model should be powerful enough for most drivers, but they prefer the V6 model because it has much stronger acceleration, excellent throttle response and doesn’t use much more fuel than the base Crosstour.

  • "We've yet to test the Crosstour with the four-cylinder engine, but performance with the V6 is more than adequate." -- Edmunds
  • "Under the hood, the standard 4-cylinder engine is nothing to be ashamed of, but we'd spring for the V6, if possible; it's nearly as fuel efficient and much more powerful. We also prefer the new 6-speed transmission, which comes with the V6 only." -- AutoTrader
  • "The 2013 Crosstour's 3,700-pound curb weight should act to hold it back, but acceleration and throttle response from the 278-horsepower V6 is quite impressive." -- Kelley Blue Book (2013)

Handling and Braking

Some critics say the 2014 Honda Crosstour is one of the better-handling vehicles in its class, with well-controlled body roll and agile cornering ability. Most test drivers think the Crosstour has a very comfortable, quiet ride on the highway. However, some reviewers write that the Crosstour doesn’t feel as composed as other Hondas, even the much-larger Pilot SUV. Front-wheel drive is standard on four-cylinder and V6 models. V6 models are also available with all-wheel drive.

  • "Handling predictably suffers due to the higher center of gravity, but the Crosstour is still one of the most carlike vehicles in its class." -- AutoTrader
  • "On the highway, the Crosstour performs admirably, providing a comfortable ride and a quiet cabin at speed." -- Edmunds
  • "The handling is crisp and precise, with body roll and lean kept to a minimum in all but the most hardcore driving situations." -- Kelley Blue Book (2013)
  • "Accord Crosstours feel solid but lack the European-style composure of previous-generation Accord sedans and even Honda's own Pilot midsize SUV." -- Consumer Guide (2011)
Review Last Updated: 5/13/14

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