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Avg. Price Paid:$6,344 - $7,156
Original MSRP: $13,850 - $15,970
MPG: 33 City / 38 Hwy
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2007 Honda Fit Performance

This performance review was written when the 2007 Honda Fit was new.

A great number of reviewers drove the 2007 Honda Fit Sport, and it appears to be their favorite trim, giving a pleasing ride as long as it isn't driven like a hot rod. As the Los Angeles Times tells it, "I spent a week with the Fit Sport and my one-word review is 'charming.'"

Edmunds adds to this praise, saying the Fit "drove like a champ, with quick steering and exquisite road feel."

While some reviewers have complaints about the 2007 Honda Fit's power, others recognize the car as acceptable for its class. Autobytel assesses fairly, "The Fit isn't exactly a speed demon but is peppy enough to navigate traffic without the need for a stiff drink when you get home." CNET decides the car is "surprisingly zippy, as long as it's relatively empty and driving on a flat surface." Other reviewers like the way the Fit moves. As the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette explains, "driving the Fit is a treat. It loves to be thrown into corners and around curves, and it passes and accelerates effortlessly. It's just about as much fun to drive as the MINI Cooper, in my view." Meanwhile, the Detroit News notes that the car is "easy to maneuver and park."

Acceleration and Power

Both the Fit and Fit Sport trim models come with a 109-horsepower, 16-valve single overhead cam VTEC four-cylinder engine. The Fit Sport adds standard cruise control and steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters. Auto writers enjoyed driving both trims. To The Auto Channel's writer, "Twenty seconds in the Fit showed me that the engine is pure Honda; it isn't as quiet as a six, but Honda has done all it could to make the engine noise as benign as possible." The New York Times finds the same for both trims: "While the two cars have small engines, their sophistication helps to compensate for their size."

The Environmental Protection Agency rates the 2007 Honda Fit with an automatic transmission at 27 miles per gallon for the city and 35 miles per gallon on highways. With a manual transmission, the EPA rates the Fit at 28 mpg in the city and 34 mpg during highway driving. Several reviewers were able to average 32 to 35 mpg while driving the Fit, but they do not specify which trim provide the best numbers. They do mention that with a smaller gasoline tank than many of its competitors, only 10.8 gallons, "frequent fill-ups will make the owner feel it is not as fuel-efficient as promised," as Edmunds writes.

The 2007 Honda Fit comes with a five-speed manual transmission standard but offers an automatic transmission as an option for both trims. A reviewer favorite, however, is the option for paddle shifters (mounted on the steering wheel) with the Fit Sport's automatic transmission. As the San Diego Union-Tribune sums up for many, "The transmission can be left in drive for automatic shifts, or the paddle shifters can be used for a quick shift up or down ... In sport mode, the transmission shifts automatically up to third gear and holds it, which is ideal for the evening commute."

Handling and Braking

The 2007 Honda Fit has a unit-body construction with front MacPherson strut and rear torsion beam suspension. Motor Trend summarizes the consensus opinion well: "suspension is firm, but not jarring." Furthermore, the Motor Trend reviewer also notes the electric power-assisted rack-and-pinion steering as "quick and smooth." The New York Times shares this opinion: "While electric steering usually feels light and numb, the Fit's seemed natural. With just the slightest turn of the steering wheel, the Fit responded. The car felt playful and eager."

For braking, the 2007 Honda Fit has power-assisted ventilated front disc/rear drum brakes (10.3 inches for the front, 7.9 inches in the rear), while also providing an anti-lock braking system and electronic brakeforce distribution. Most reviews that mention braking sum it up as uneventful, in a good way. "The brake pedal has a progressive action for smooth stops," MSN explains, while Autobytel further describes a pedal that's good under foot, "never stiff or mushy."

Review Last Updated: 5/2/08

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