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#1

in 2010 Affordable Small Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $10,394 - $12,967
Original MSRP: $14,900 - $19,110
MPG: 28 City / 35 Hwy
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2010 Honda Fit Performance

This performance review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Honda's reputation for solid engineering translates well in the Fit. Although several reviewers grumble about noticeable road noise, everyone agrees that it works well as a daily driver. While it's not as zippy as the Mazda3, the Fit still has a bit of zoom-zoom of its own.

  • "The engine is fairly quiet at idle, but produces a buzzy whine under acceleration, especially at higher engine speeds. Bump noise is well suppressed, but wind and road noise combine for raucous highway travel." -- Consumer Guide
  • "We got behind the wheel of a Sport model with the automatic transmission, which includes a set of solid paddle shifters. This is and will be Honda's most popular model, and for good reason. For something this small and inexpensive, it's one of the most fun things we've driven in a long time." -- Motor Trend

Acceleration and Power

The Honda Fit is not a sports car, but it does deliver a reasonably satisfying ride for its class. Moreover, its excellent fuel economy would make nearly all of its class competitors green with envy. That said, if speed is important to you, consider the Mazda3. It has power to spare and a base price in the same general range as the Fit.

All Fits are equipped with the same 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine that pumps out 117 horsepower, giving the car some pep. Most reviewers agree that the standard manual transmission gives the Fit a sporty feel, but the Fit Sport's automatic with paddle shifters also delivers a more fun ride.

The EPA reports that the base 2010 Fit achieves 28/35 mpg city/highway with the automatic transmission. 

  • "Adequate around town with either transmission, though Fit feels livelier with the manual. Highway passing takes patience, but at least the automatic kicks down quickly for more power." -- Consumer Guide
  • "As isolated and smooth as it is over rough roads, the new Fit isn't quite the go-kart it once was. A back-to-back drive of old versus new confirmed our impressions. We suspect most drivers looking for a car in this class will be willing to trade some of that spunky fun attitude for the more refined package -- especially if long freeway commutes are the norm rather than the exception." -- Popular Mechanics

Handling and Braking

Test drivers tend to agree that the Fit offers excellent ride quality, although they say the Sport model offers better handling than the base model. The Fit is a great choice as an urban runabout, but if an ultra-smooth ride is high on your priorities list, you should definitely take the Volkswagen Rabbit for a test drive. It has one of the most velvety rides in its class.

  • "Tidy exterior dimensions make all Fits highly maneuverable." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Like all subcompacts, it's highly maneuverable and a great urban runabout. Where the Fit rises above the rest is in the way it actually drives. Because of its approximately 2,500-pound curb weight and wonderfully direct steering, the Fit feels light and nimble while cornering." -- Edmunds
  • "Superb handling is what really stands out with the ... Honda Fit. It's no sports car, but we found the Fit rather agile, thanks in part to the added body rigidity and, on the Sport trim, the rear stabilizer bar." -- Kelley Blue Book