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MSRP: $29,450 - $37,380
Invoice: $26,936 - $34,169
MPG: 15 City / 21 Hwy
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2013 Honda Ridgeline Interior

Review Last Updated: 10/8/13

Reviewers say that in the 2013 Ridgeline’s cabin, form takes a back seat to function. They point out that while everything appears to be well-built, the extensive use of hard plastics detracts from the Ridgeline’s appeal. Despite this, most praise the highly practical cabin, which offers good small-item storage and space in back for larger items. They also appreciate the lockable in-bed trunk and the dual-action tailgate, which either drops down like most trucks, or swings out, making it easier to access the back of the bed or trunk.

  • "Ridgeline's cabin falls short of the upscale ambiance offered on some larger trucks, but in this class, it's more than serviceable. There's plenty of hard plastic trim on the dashboard and door panels, but it's all screwed together well." -- Consumer Guide
  • "While the Ridgeline's interior design is rational, the plastics Honda uses are hard and dull, devoid of any warmth. It creates a vaguely industrial feel reminiscent of designs from a decade ago." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Overall, there's something charming in the Ridgeline's comfortable yet rugged cabin that seems eager to please." -- Edmunds (2012)

Seating

The Ridgeline can seat up to five people. Cloth upholstery is standard on the lower trims, and leather with front heating is available on just the top trim. Power seats are only available on the top RTS and RTL trims. Reviewers like the front seats, saying they’re supportive and comfortable, and offer a good view of the road ahead. One critic points out that taller drivers may have difficulty finding a good driving position, as the Ridgeline’s steering wheel does not telescope, and the seat does not move back far enough. Some also note that rearward visibility is less than stellar, as the large back pillars impinge on sightlines.

Reviewers aren’t all that enamored with the Ridgeline’s back seats. Generally, reviewers find the back seats sufficiently comfortable, although one critic mentions that the seats themselves are thinly padded and not angled enough to provide a comfortable riding position.

  • "Headroom is pretty good, even beneath the housing of the RTL's standard sunroof. Legroom is less than stellar; most adults will be fine, but the very tall will want more rearward seat travel. Visibility is not great on account of thick roof pillars." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The Ridgeline's interior gets high marks for passenger friendliness, with comfortable seats up front and above-average legroom -- at least by midsize pickup standards -- in back." -- Edmunds (2010)

 

Interior Features

The Ridgeline offers an abundance of standard features, at least by compact truck standards. Power windows, locks and mirrors are standard, as are a six-speaker stereo, keyless entry and a backup camera. The second-highest RTS trim gets dual-zone climate control and a stereo upgrade, while the top RTL trim is available with a power sunroof, satellite radio and a navigation system paired with Bluetooth. A USB port is notably absent from the list of available features, though an auxiliary input jack comes on all but the base model.

Reviewers like the interior controls, saying the knobs are straightforward and simple to use. One critic does mention that the auxiliary input jack is hard to reach. Reviewers haven’t said a lot about the navigation system in the Ridgeline, but those who have tested the same system in the Honda Pilot say it is fairly easy to use.

See the full 2013 Honda Ridgeline specs »

  • "The gauges are … large, easy to read, and brightly lit. The audio controls are mounted high on the dashboard, with some functions just out of easy reach. The auxiliary stereo input jack for connecting an MP3 player is inconveniently located on the passenger side of the dashboard." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Control knobs are king-size, as are the puffy, square control pads for the electronic controls on the steering wheel. Of course, their large size serves a practical function, as these controls can be easily used while wearing work gloves." -- Edmunds (2012)

Cargo

Reviewers tend to like the Ridgeline’s lockable, in-bed trunk, which can hold up to 8.5 cubic feet of cargo. The spare tire is also kept in the trunk, and some reviewers point out that accessing the spare would be difficult if the bed is loaded up. Critics also like the dual-action tailgate, which not only drops down like other trucks’ tailgates, but swings to one side, making it easier to reach items farther back in the bed or in the trunk compartment. Inside, reviewers report that there are plenty of storage areas for smaller items like cell phones. The back seats are split 60/40 and fold up to improve cargo-carrying capability for larger items in the cab.

  • "Its swing-open feature is nifty, too. Ditto the in-bed ‘trunk’ with 8.5 cubic feet of covered, lockable space." -- Consumer Guide
  • "In any case, the 2013 Honda Ridgeline's interior is highly functional, with lots of little storage bins throughout the cabin and a rear seat bottom that can be folded up to create an additional cargo space." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "The Ridgeline's unique bed design comes with one drawback: It places the spare tire under the floor. This means you may be faced with the prospect of unloading your cargo to access the spare if you have a flat." -- Edmunds (2012)

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