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MSRP: $24,250 - $34,250
Invoice: $23,060 - $32,117
MPG: 21 City / 30 Hwy
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2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe Performance

With more power, as well as updated transmissions and suspension components, test drivers report that the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe has become a more credible sports car. Still, some say that while the Genesis Coupe offers a balanced ride and good power, it falls short with handling that trails competitors like the Scion FR-S.

  • "Under hard throttle, the exhaust emits a mild midrange honk that climbs in pitch with acceleration. Outside of the car the tone is even more raucous, and should be music to the ears of any remaining members of the Fast and Furious club." -- Car and Driver 
  • "In terms of acceleration and handling, the Genesis Coupe is competitive with a wide array of models. It's also a lot of fun to drive, yet still quite functional on a daily basis." -- Edmunds 
  • "While the smaller powerplant is peppy and propels the stylish rear-drive coupe quickly, the star of the show is the V-6." -- Road and Track 
  • "Communication between car and driver gets high marks for clarity, and the big Brembo brakes will cover for a lot of mistakes." -- Popular Mechanics 
  • "Despite building torque at an admirably low 2,000 rpm, the turbocharged four-cylinder takes its sweet time arriving at full thrust. Don't get us wrong, the twin scroll turbo has significantly diminished lag, but if you want to be quickest out of every apex, you'd better not let the tachometer fall too far south." -- Autoblog 

Acceleration and Power

Just like the 2012 model, the 2013 Genesis Coupe lets you choose between a turbocharged 2.0-liter four cylinder and a 3.8-liter V6 engine, but both engines produce more power for 2013. The 2.0T’s turbo-four now produces 274 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 275 pound-feet of torque at 2,000 rpm. The more powerful Genesis Coupe 3.8 generates 348 horsepower at 6,400 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque at 5,300 rpm. That’s 64 and 42 more horsepower than 2012 models equipped with the turbo-four and V6, respectively.

In general, reviewers agree that the V6 is powerful and refined. Many also note that the four-cylinder has enough horsepower to compete with other affordable sports cars. A handful of critics note that the Genesis Coupe 2.0T suffers from a bit of turbo lag, but with all that extra power for 2013, the V6 is no longer the clear-cut choice for performance addicts.

Regardless of which engine you choose, both models are available with either an updated six-speed manual transmission or a new eight-speed automatic with manual mode and paddle shifters. Most critics agree that while the manual transmission is improved, it still lacks the refinement of those found in rivals like the Mini Coupe and Nissan 370Z. And while they like the optional automatic’s refinement, they say that in manual mode, it doesn’t respond to paddle shifts as quickly as they’d like.

Although it’s more powerful, Hyundai’s performance tweaks haven’t hurt the rear-wheel drive Genesis Coupe’s fuel economy. According to the EPA, the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 2.0T gets 21/30 mpg and 20/31 mpg city/highway with manual and automatic transmissions, respectively. The Genesis Coupe 3.8 gets 18/27 mpg city/highway with the six-speed manual, while automatic models get 18/28 mpg city/highway. 

  • "The manual transmission's improved clutch pedal take-up is usefully fluid, but the gear shifter itself is still a little notchy and vague, and it's still a challenge to heel-and-toe smoothly." -- Automobile Magazine 
  • "At idle, the Genesis's V-6 remains smooth and steady, and revs climb willingly with a blip of the throttle. Although its peak torque doesn't arrive until 5300 rpm, the engine is strong from 2000 rpm in almost any gear." -- Car and Driver 
  • "This year's new eight-speed automatic works pretty well, though sometimes it's slow to downshift." -- Edmunds 
  • "The engine has a fruitful supply of torque throughout the rpm spectrum." -- Road and Track 
  • "While it is smooth, the new 8-speed automatic doesn't respond to its paddle shifters with the right-now enthusiasm of a dual-clutch automated manual." -- Popular Mechanics 
  • "On the street, swapping gears was as second nature as it should be. Clutch take up is properly progressive with good feel and an appropriate throw." -- Autoblog 

Handling and Braking

Along with more power, the revamped 2013 Genesis Coupe features an updated suspension system. Most reviewers have only had a chance to drive the Genesis Coupe on smooth Nevada roads, but so far, most agree that strong brakes and communicative steering are among the Genesis Coupe’s attributes. While most say that the Genesis Coupe has balanced handling, some counter that it lacks the cornering prowess of rivals like the Subaru BRZ and Scion FR-S.

If you like the Genesis Coupe and want the best-handling model possible, consider either the R-Spec or Track trim, which feature larger wheels and stiffer springs for better cornering ability.

  • "The lightweight (well under 3000 lb), minimalist, low-powered BRZ and FR-S have the finely nuanced manners of true sports cars, while the Genesis coupe, for all its charms, simply doesn't." -- Automobile Magazine 
  • "On the highway it feels tight, but not irritatingly so; subtle steering corrections do not result in over-reactive directional changes." -- Car and Driver 
  • "On the road, the 2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe impresses with its balanced handling, precise steering and generally likable ride quality." -- Edmunds 
  • "At Spring Mountain Motorsports Ranch, the car felt composed through a variety of turns, with the rear end coming out slightly if you weren't careful." -- Road and Track 
  • "And the hydraulic power rack-and-pinion steering is quicker, with road feel as good as anything in this class." -- Popular Mechanics 
  • "While the leather-wrapped steering wheel looks right at home in a sports car, steering feel is still a bit too numb for our tastes." -- Autoblog 
Review Last Updated: 5/14/14

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