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  • 2015
  • 2014 Jaguar F-Type

#5

in Luxury Sports Cars

MSRP: $69,000 - $92,000
Invoice: $63,825 - $85,100
MPG: 20 City / 28 Hwy
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Jaguar F-Type Performance

Although some reviewers say that the all-new 2014 Jaguar F-Type lacks the dynamic performance of sports cars like the Porsche 911 and Boxster S on the track, most agree that the F-Type offers a combination of athleticism and comfort that should appeal to most luxury sports car buyers.

  • "Its supercharged engine is a known quantity and a true gem, the eight-speed automatic guarantees even more joyful paddleshifts per mile, the chassis wears the Entertainment Guild's seal of approval." -- Automobile Magazine 
  • "The F-Type will be an absolute joy for pilots who crave performance, yet the car is elegantly civilized when driven conservatively. Get deeper into the gas pedal and the rush of acceleration is accompanied by a glorious exhaust note that rivals anything from Italy." -- Edmunds 
  • "In terms of raw performance, the F-Type feels less visceral and immediate than the Boxster S or 911, and it probably would lose to either on a track. But this is an everyday sports car that's comfortable, smooth and effortlessly quick; it's as much car as 90% of buyers in this segment will ever need or want." -- Los Angeles Times 
  • "Dynamically, the new F-Type finds itself in very fast company, a sports car with accelerative, braking and cornering ability that transcend its price. It is certainly a purer sports machine than the Mercedes-Benz SL, and though Jaguar execs touted it as a Porsche 911 competitor, it strikes us as more analogous to the Chevrolet Corvette than the 911." -- Kelley Blue Book 

Acceleration and Power

The 2014 Jaguar F-Type comes with a supercharged 3.0-liter V6 engine that produces 340 horsepower and 332 pound-feet of torque. A more powerful supercharged 3.0-liter V6 comes in F-Type S models, which generates 380 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque, while the F-Type V8 S (convertible only) comes with a supercharged 5.0-liter V8 engine that produces 495 horsepower and 460 pound-feet of torque. An eight-speed automatic transmission is standard with all models. Jaguar says that the base F-Type accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 5.1 seconds and has a top speed of 161 mph, while the F-Type V8 S accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in 4.2 seconds and has a top speed of 186 mph. The EPA reports that the base 2014 F-Type convertible gets 20/28 mpg city/highway, which is pretty good for a luxury sports car. Still, rivals like the Porsche Boxster use a bit less fuel. 

Test drivers note that the base F-Type offers ample power that should satisfy most shoppers, while the extra power that the F-Type S provides is most noticeable at higher rpm. The F-Type V8 S offers a substantial power increase, and reviewers think that it’s undoubtedly the most athletic convertible in the F-Type lineup. Most critics love the eight-speed automatic transmission that comes in all F-Type models, noting that its smooth, quick shifts make it one of the best transmissions available. Still, a few reviewers say that an automated manual transmission could make the F-Type even more enjoyable to drive.

  • "Although the 495-hp V8 is clearly a much faster car, the slightly lighter V6S with 380 hp felt like more of a driver's car with its mechanical limited-slip diff. In both cases, the eight-speed ZF transmission was very quick and precise in performance driving. Even so, I was left hoping for a double clutch, rev-matching transmission, though I doubt it will affect demand." -- AutoWeek 
  • "The base F delivers more than enough thrills for most folks. The V-6 S's extra power is only noticeable at the top of the rev range, although the chassis upgrades should be considered mandatory for anyone with track-day intentions. The V-8 S is the predator lion of the F breed, always on the prowl for unsuspecting prey." -- Car and Driver 
  • "The most progressive component of either car was its transmission. The F-Type's eight-speed ZF automatic is a magnificent piece of engineering, one of the best transmissions in the business. At Lime Rock, it used second through sixth, snapping off shifts with none of the laziness common to torque converters, and the shifts were so smooth and telepathic that they were barely noticeable, even when they came in a turn." -- Road and Track 
  • "In any driving situation, the transmission and engine work together in a remarkably silken performance. The duo accelerates as smoothly as you'd hope from a car this handsome, and throws out a robust exhaust note that's worthy of a car costing twice this much." -- Los Angeles Times  

Handling and Braking

While some auto writers report that competitors like the Porsche Boxster may be more athletic on the track, most agree that the 2014 F-Type excels on normal roads. They say that it corners with precision, and that there’s no body roll when the F-Type is driven through turns. The F-Type also earns praise for feeling planted and composed in wet weather, and critics report that there’s no nose dive during hard braking. While some reviewers praise the F-Type for its accurate steering, others note that the system doesn’t provide quite as much feedback as they would like.

  • "Handling is very predictable and forgiving. Certainly, the Boxster is still a more precise car to drive on track, but in practical terms and in common road conditions the Jaguar is great. I was particularly impressed with the handling during a 100-mile drive in monsoon-like conditions on a slick highway with a lot of standing water. The F-Type felt utterly planted and at no stage was there any intervention of stability control." -- AutoWeek 
  • "There is no roll in the bends, no brake dive, and not a hint of squat during a full-bore leap forward. Jaguar's earnest intention is confirmed by the lack of Comfort or Normal settings for the F's adaptive dampers. This Porsche in a cat suit pounces on apexes and keeps all paws planted." -- Car and Driver 
  • "After winding our way through an endless string of roundabouts outside of Pamplona, Spain, we hit the open country roads in the base V-6. Speeding through sweeping curves and along scenic straightaways, it was easy to find a comfortable driving rhythm thanks to the responsive steering (the variable-ratio rack is Jaguar's quickest) and the balanced chassis." -- Popular Mechanics 
  • "The power steering system of the 2014 F-Type is hydraulic, unlike most of its modern competitors that have switched to electronic systems. Somehow in spite of this, though, steering feel is a bit lacking. It weights up nicely during high-speed cornering but ultimately doesn't give the driver as much feed back as we'd like. The wheels did exactly what we wanted them to; the feel just wasn't as communicative as the Porsche competition." -- Left Lane News 
Review Last Updated: 5/13/14

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