GO
#10

in 2009 Luxury Large Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $20,011 - $22,880
Original MSRP: $49,200 - $63,700
MPG: 16 City / 25 Hwy
Search Used Listings:

2009 Jaguar XF Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

The interior of the 2009 XF abandons the old-world luxury reputation of Jaguars from the past in favor of a 21st century high-tech cockpit. The seats are comfortable and the materials are lush, but the cabin is clearly designed to put on a show. When you enter the car and close the door, a heartbeat sounds and the start/stop button pulses. Push it, and a spun-nickel shift dial (instead of a lever) rises into your hand from the console. To open the glovebox or turn on the overhead lights, you merely touch small targets built into wood trim pieces. It's not for everyone, but some reviewers love the special effects.

  • "Quality wood, leather, and aluminum, with an abundance of padded surfaces contribute to an upscale ambiance." -- Consumer Guide
  • "In Jaguar tradition there is plenty of finely finished wood trim, as well as modern handsome metallic accents and cool blue lighting for the instruments." -- Edmunds
  • "The cowl and the window sills are pushed lower, bringing more light inside, yet you won't feel as if you were sitting on the car instead of in it because the substantial armrests, on the doors and tunnel, have been raised." -- Car and Driver
  • "Watch out, Audi: The XF will have your celebrated cockpit stylists grumbling with professional jealousy and admiration." -- Motor Trend

Seating

The front seats of the XF are comfortable and supportive, whether cruising calmly on a long drive or weaving energetically through switchbacks. The rear seats, however, are a bit cramped and the car's sloping roofline robs rear seat passengers of headroom.

  • "Seats are well-shaped and come up high enough for proper thigh support, while the soft armrests are located for use, not style...The XF's refined ride can take you 300 miles and deliver you still feeling fresh after your journey." -- Edmunds
  • "Though not ample, space is adequate for most adults. A standard power tilt and telescopic steering wheel helps drivers find a comfortable position. The seats are comfortable with good support." -- Consumer Guide
  • "You're belted into a big easy chair, your elbows and trousers cosseted by fine leather." -- Car and Driver

Interior Features

The novelty of the XF's cabin is the focus of many reviewers' attention -- its high-tech toys aren't found in any other car. But many say there is a logic to the devices beyond mere novelty. The electronics are fairly easy to use, and the materials are sumptuous. Some point to Jaguar's history of reliability problems, however, and wonder if the XF's extensive list of new toys offers a lot of opportunities for something to go wrong.

  • "Gauges are unobstructed. Give Jaguar credit for eschewing a control-knob interface (a la Audi and BMW) in favor of a touch screen for most audio and climate functions. Still, many simple tasks require several ‘virtual button' presses, though redundant controls on the steering wheel help." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Behold! On startup, a knob rises from the surface of the console to replace the traditional gear lever. It's a great act, like the deployment of some James Bond just-in-time gizmo. You'll use it surprisingly little, only when you need D or R or the sport mode." -- Car and Driver
  • "Bowers & Wilkins (better known as B&W) stereo systems provide up to 14 speakers and 440 watts of clean sound. Cabin lighting and glovebox mechanisms are both touch-activated. Speaking of tactile interfaces, we like the navigation touchscreen -- but it does require more pressure than other manufacturers' systems, and that can be annoying at times...Still, we'd pick Jaguar's solution over BMW's iDrive any day." -- Popular Mechanics

Cargo

The XF's 17.7 cubic-foot trunk is one of the largest on the road, and the space is easily accessible with a large opening. 

  • "At 17.7 cu ft, the sedan's trunk is the largest in its class. Seatbacks fold flat, but headrests will have to be removed if the front seats are moved too far back. Interior small-item storage is good." -- Consumer Guide
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product