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#6

in Used Small Cars $14K and up

Avg. Price Paid: $12,594 - $15,377
Original MSRP: $13,600 - $17,900
MPG: 28 City / 36 Hwy
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2013 Kia Rio Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

The 2013 Kia Rio’s interior is generally praised by critics for offering lots of standard features for the class, as well as ample space and comfort for passengers in the front and back. It also has competitive cargo space for the class whether you choose the sedan or hatchback. Though many note that the quality of materials is nothing to write home about, they are competitive for the segment. Reviewers also like the overall interior design, saying it is stylish.

  • "Interior is an attractive combination of hard plastics and strategically placed soft-touch surfaces. Overall, the cabin presents well for the class with simple, tasteful detailing. The available leather-wrapped steering wheel feels good to the touch." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The Rio's cabin boasts very good build and materials quality. Although there is a lot of hard plastic trim, it is nicely grained and doesn't scream economy car." -- Edmunds (2012)
  • "There are more soft touch materials in the cabin than most in the segment, and seats are very supportive, some thought them on the hard side, but all could agree that the seat fabric looks cheap." -- Motor Week (2012)

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Seating

The 2013 Kia Rio’s cabin mostly receives praise for offering plenty of space for passengers in the front and back. Headroom and legroom are plentiful, and reviewers say the seats are comfortable. One critic notes that taller drivers shouldn’t have trouble finding a comfortable driving position, which can’t always be said about affordable small cars. While critics generally don’t complain about the back seat, some note that taller passengers might find it cramped.

  • "Even bigger folk should be comfortable up front. Good headroom for six footers, and the long seat travel allows for ample legroom. The seats are lightly bolstered and comfortable. An available tilt-and-telescope steering wheel helps fine tune driving position." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Tiny is a relative term, however, as full-size adults can still fit comfortably in all the outboard positions of the Rio's four-door sedan or hatchback body. Plus, with its high-mounted dash, reasonably quiet cabin and composed ride, the Rio feels much bigger than it is when you are behind the wheel." -- Edmunds

Interior Features

The 2013 Kia Rio comes standard with a USB port, auxiliary input jack and steering wheel-mounted audio controls. Features like navigation, a backup camera, Bluetooth and Kia’s UVO infotainment system are optional.

Most critics are fairly positive about the Rio’s cabin, saying the controls are easy to use. They note that Kia’s infotainment system works better than Ford’s SYNC system, though its voice recognition software isn’t as comprehensive.

  • "Simple, straight forward controls are well marked and easy to use. The radio is mounted high on the dash and the climate controls a bit low, but both are easy to use with a combination of buttons and knobs. The gauges are clearly marked and easy to read." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The climate and audio controls are easy to use, while the available Uvo voice-activated electronics interface is another nice bonus. Although we've found its voice recognition abilities aren't quite to the level of Ford's Sync, its accompanying touchscreen interfaces are more user-friendly than the buttons and screens found in Ford's Fiesta and Focus." -- Edmunds
  • "The list of standard features is impressive, including power outside mirrors with defrosting, satellite radio, air conditioning, and steering-wheel audio controls. It's easy to take such features for granted, but pretty easy, too, to find competitors without them." -- USA Today (2012)

Cargo

The 2013 Kia Rio has competitive cargo space, both in sedan and hatchback body styles. Sedans offer 13.7 cubic feet of trunk space, while hatchback models offer 15 cubic feet with the back seats upright or 49.8 cubic feet when they are folded. One critic notes that the hatch opening is small and that the load floor is a bit too high, saying it might limit the Rio’s ability to carry large items.

  • "Count this as another subcompact that doesn't feel all that subcompact. When it comes time to carry cargo as well as passengers, the sedan has a generous 13.7-cubic-foot trunk. For maximum stuff-hauling potential, though, you'll want to consider the hatchback, which measures about 50 cubic feet with the seats down. That's less than a Honda Fit, but more than a Ford Fiesta." -- Edmunds
  • "They fold almost completely flat on our hatchback (we have yet to sample a sedan), creating one of the larger rear holds in the segment. However, the relatively small hatch opening and high bottom ledge will limit its ability to swallow bulky items." -- Automobile Magazine (2012)