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#18

in 2012 Affordable Small Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $11,715 - $14,398
Original MSRP: $13,900 - $19,600
MPG: 25 City / 30 Hwy
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2012 Kia Soul Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

The 2012 Kia Soul’s well-equipped cabin features decent materials, reviewers say, but they do note that the plastic is a little hard and cheap. But other than that, test drivers are pleased with the Soul’s spacious cabin that offers plenty of standard features, great passenger space and several interior cubbies.

  • "Clearly marked gauges are easy to read. Audio and climate controls are within easy reach and use simple to understand buttons and dials." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Beyond some mildly eccentric cabin decor options, including a bold red-on-black color scheme and disco-riffic glow-in-the-dark seat fabric, the Soul's fairly spacious interior doesn't fall too far from the Kia tree: glossy and hard but functional and inoffensive." -- Automobile Magazine
  • "There are lots of thoughtful storage nooks and crannies, along with cool, quirky features such as the audio speakers that flash mood lighting to match the bass notes. Rear seat passengers will find sufficient space behind even tall front seat occupants." -- San Francisco Chronicle

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Seating

The five-seat Kia Soul is very spacious and includes plenty of legroom and headroom for passengers. Even adults can sit in the back seat comfortably. There is one complaint about seat cushioning though. One tester dislikes that the lumbar support isn’t adjustable, and that there isn’t enough side bolstering.

  • "Ample headroom and legroom for most adults. The seats are comfortable and offer decent support. Visibility is good forward and directly to the rear. Large rear roof pillars hamper the view to the rear corners, but the generous side mirrors help somewhat. Tall doors and a high seating position make entry and exit a snap. … Adult size headroom, legroom, and foot space, even behind another adult. The seat may be a bit tight for three-across seating though. Entry and exit are easy." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The 2012 Soul's ride is agreeable for a long haul, and we were pleased to find road and wind noise better than anticipated." -- Motor Trend
  • "The seats lack significant side bolsters and adjustable lumbar support, yet they recline, slide and are height-adjustable to fit most everyone. Outward visibly is good, and the new gauges and switchgear layout is logical." -- Autoblog

Interior Features

In line with its youthful spirit, the Soul boasts more entertainment and technology options than most cars in its price range. The base Soul comes standard with satellite radio, Bluetooth and steering wheel-mounted audio and cruise controls, making the 2012 Soul very well-equipped for the class. While the Soul has an impressive list of standard features that are logically arranged on the dash, reviewers think the plastics, which scuff easily, are cheap.

This year, Soul Exclaim and Plus models can be equipped with UVO, a voice-activated infotainment system that provides phone, entertainment and vehicle information. Reviewers haven’t commented on this system yet.

  • "Outward visibly is good, and the new gauges and switchgear layout is logical." -- Autoblog
  • "Hard plastics benefit from interesting textures, but the dashboard seems to be easily scuffed making our nearly new test car look a bit tired." -- Consumer Guide 

Cargo

The Soul boasts plenty of interior storage cubbies for smaller items, including under-floor storage. The 2012 Kia Soul’s cargo space is good for the class. It has 19.3 cubic feet available with the rear seats in use, and 53.4 available with them folded. The Honda Fit, however, has up to 57.3 cubic feet of cargo space and passenger seats that adjust to let you haul a bike or surfboard.

  • "Cargo space is good behind the rear seat, folds in a 60/40 split to provide even more cargo space. The cargo area also includes a handy under-floor organizer. Generous front-seat storage areas include a large bi-level glovebox, small covered dashtop compartment, console armrest bin, and door pockets with bottle holders. There's also a handy open bin in front of the shifter that's directly below two 12V power sockets, and the auxiliary and USB jacks." -- Consumer Guide
  • "As is the case with the front seats, second-row seat cushions also lack hip-holding bolsters, but that design allows their 60:40 split to fold nearly flat to accommodate oversized cargo without drama." -- Autoblog
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product