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#14

in Used Small Cars $14K and up

Avg. Price Paid: $13,063 - $15,742
Original MSRP: $14,400 - $19,900
MPG: 25 City / 30 Hwy
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2013 Kia Soul Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

According to reviewers, the 2013 Kia Soul is made with hard plastics, which is common for the class, but they say it has more standard features than many of its rivals. Test drivers are also pleased with the Soul’s spacious cabin, which offers roomy passenger accommodations, good cargo space and easy-to-use controls.

  • "Just because the 2013 Kia Soul is long on style doesn't mean it's short on practicality. With its modern look and pronounced center stack, the passenger cabin offers a nice balance between form and function." -- Edmunds
  • "While hard plastics and basic fabric materials don't impart a premium atmosphere, the Soul doesn't come across as cheap because of how much standard equipment you can see from the driver's seat." -- Autoblog (2012)
  • "Interesting textures help perk up the hard plastics, but the easily scuffed dash in our nearly new test car already looked a little tired." -- Consumer Guide

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Seating

Overall, test drivers think the five-seat Kia Soul has a spacious cabin. Reviewers say that the front seats are roomy and offer plenty of head- and legroom, as well as good forward visibility. One test driver mentions that the Soul’s rear pillars hamper visibility. They say that even adults can sit in the back seat comfortably, which is uncommon praise for an affordable small car.

  • "One of the benefits of the Soul's boxy design is abundant head- and legroom, even in the backseat." -- Edmunds
  • "Up front, Soul boasts ample headroom and legroom for most adults. The seats are comfortable and offer decent support. There is good visibility forward and directly to the rear. Large rear roof pillars hamper the view to the rear corners, and the generous side mirrors only help somewhat." -- Consumer Guide
  • "The … Soul's ride is agreeable for a long haul, and we were pleased to find road and wind noise better than anticipated." -- Motor Trend (2012)

Interior Features

The base Soul comes standard with a four-speaker stereo, satellite radio, Bluetooth, USB and auxiliary input jacks and steering-wheel mounted Bluetooth, audio and cruise controls. Optional features include a UVO infotainment system, HD Radio, a rearview camera, an Infinity sound system and push-button start.

Several reviewers say that the Soul’s controls are straightforward and their placement in the dashboard makes sense. One test driver says that even with the optional infotainment system, the controls are still easy to use. That’s high praise because many test drivers complain that infotainment systems make features harder to use. Some Soul models can come with Idle Stop and Go technology, which shuts of the engine when the car is idling. Many reviewers dislike this feature, and one noticed that the heater doesn’t work well when the engine shuts off.

See the full 2013 Kia Soul features and specs »

  • "Gauges and controls are logically located and intuitive to use, even when you take into account high-tech options like the voice-controlled Uvo infotainment system that allows you to control your cell phone, iPod and more with voice commands." -- Edmunds
  • "While the engine is off, the heater doesn't seem all that willing to heat, either." -- Automobile Magazine (2012)
  • "Outward visibly is good, and the new gauges and switchgear layout is logical." -- Autoblog (2012)

Cargo

The 2013 Kia Soul has 19.3 cubic feet available with the rear seats in use, and 53.4 cubic feet with them folded. Most test drivers think the Soul offers plenty of interior storage and cargo space, and they like the flat load floor, which makes it easier to pack the cargo area. However, one reviewer thinks the Soul’s available cargo space pales in comparison with its rivals.

  • "Cargo space is good behind the rear seat, and it folds in a 60/40 split to provide even more cargo space. Even better, with the seat backs down the resulting load floor is nearly flat, a big plus when loading bulky items. … Generous interior storage areas include a big bi-level glovebox, small covered dashtop compartment, console armrest bin, and door pockets with bottle holders." -- Consumer Guide
  • "Limited cargo room versus competitors." -- Edmunds
  • "As is the case with the front seats, second-row seat cushions also lack hip-holding bolsters, but that design allows their 60:40 split to fold nearly flat to accommodate oversized cargo without drama." -- Autoblog (2012)
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product