GO
#3

in 2011 Luxury Large Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $29,015 - $32,942
Original MSRP: $46,900 - $55,370
MPG: 19 City / 26 Hwy
Search Used Listings:

2011 Lexus GS Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

Reviewers note that the GS continues the Lexus tradition of well-appointed interiors. It generally receives high marks for posh materials and excellent build quality, as well as its exceptional quietness at speed. Still, the Lexus GS can be a tight fit for taller drivers and rear-seat passengers.

  • "Lexus-typical cabin decor blends high-grade plastics and leather. Other trim bits are genuine wood, but the reddish color used to stain those pieces makes them look fake." -- Consumer Guide  
  • "Overall, the GS 460's cabin remains blissfully silent, insulating passengers from the powerful V8 as well as the outside world." -- Edmunds 
  • "Plenty of lux features abound on the GS: 10-way power adjustable heated front seats, four colors of leather trim, three different wood trims, 10-speaker audio, and cut pile carpeting are standard; navigation system and Mark Levinson audio are options." -- Motor Trend 
  • "Supple leather, brushed aluminum and bird's-eye maple help define a well-organized, well-isolated and exceptionally comfortable cabin in all GS versions." -- Kelley Blue Book 
  • "Materials are top notch throughout, if a little conservative in their selection compared to rivals. A richly burled wood grain and a traditional felt-like headliner stand in contrast to the matte or suede finish exotic materials found elsewhere." -- Left Lane News 

See More Photos »

Seating 

The heated front seats of the Lexus GS earn high praise from reviewers for their comfort and adjustability. There’s enough support for sudden turns, yet the seats are still posh enough for longer drives. Despite seat comfort, the GS falls short when it comes to head and leg room. This is especially true for rear-seat passengers, even more so if someone is seated in the middle position. Taller drivers, or those seeking better rear-seat accommodations, may prefer the Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedan or the Lincoln MKS.

  • "Legroom gets tight quickly as the front seats are pushed back. As in front, even average-sized passengers will find headroom lacking. Entry and exit are hampered by narrow door openings." -- Consumer Guide 
  • "Average sized adults will fit comfortably, but taller passengers may desire a bit more headroom -- at least compared to other sedans in this class. This is especially true for those relegated to the center rear seat, which is slightly elevated compared to the outboard seats." -- Edmunds 
  • "Nicely formed power front buckets are the best seats in the house, but even the "bucketed" rear bench has sufficient head and legroom to handle a pair of adults and the occasional smaller child in the less-hospitable center spot." -- Kelley Blue Book 
  • "Five occupants fit inside the GS 350, though the backseat is snug." -- Cars.com 
  • "The more cramped proportions give the GS’s senior status away, too. The sloping roofline cuts deeply into head room and rear seat ingress and egress. At least the four outboard seats are comfortable and supportive, boasting aggressive bolsters and fine leather trim." -- Left Lane News 

Interior Features

While high-quality materials like leather and wood create a comfortable environment inside the Lexus GS, reviewers still note that interior tech is still a little behind the competition.

Automakers such as Mercedes, BMW and Audi have added a single control that manages all entertainment and climate functions. Lexus offers separate controls for each system. By comparison, the GS’ electronics look a little dated, although the optional navigation system does earn points for its ease of use. Shoppers who find systems like Mercedes’s COMAND or BMW’s iDrive confusing may find comfort in the Lexus GS’ controls. However, Lexus has moved to a similar interface in many of their other models, and may offer something similar on the GS in the years ahead.

  • "Switches for such functions as power-mirror adjustment, trip-odometer reset, and fuel-door release are in a drop-down pod to the lower left of the steering wheel. This compromises access to these controls and, if left open, can hit the knee of a driver entering or exiting the vehicle. Also complicating things is the touchscreen control system, which governs too many functions, muddling what should be simple adjustments." -- Consumer Guide 
  • "Our gripes are minor and include less-than-intuitive audio controls and a distracting glare from the highly polished wood trim. The GS reclaims some points for its optional high-resolution touchscreen and easy-to-operate navigation system." -- Edmunds 
  • "Manual-style gear changes still must be made using the conventional console lever, as neither transmission offers steering-wheel-mounted shift buttons or paddles." -- Kelley Blue Book 
  • "Here’s where the GS is starting to show its age. Conventional switchgear contrasts with the ever-complex interior configurations found in the rest of the segment. Where rivals have touch screens and buttons galore, a base GS (not our tester) features simple climate and audio controls. With the optional navigation package, Lexus’s standard -- and rather dated -- touch screen display is added." -- Left Lane News 

Cargo

With 15.2 cubic feet of trunk space, the Lexus GS is about average for the class. However, reviewers note that the trunk opening is small and that the GS lacks a folding rear seat. Storage inside the cabin is also at a minimum. Shoppers looking for more cargo space should also look at the Cadillac DTS or the Lincoln MKS, which are the class leaders in terms of cargo.

  • "Bulky rear-wheel arches intrude. The trunk lid swings on noninvasive strut-type hinges, but its small opening makes for awkward loading. There's no folding rear seat back, just a slim pass-through." -- Consumer Guide 
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product