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Avg. Price Paid:$9,896 - $11,970
Original MSRP: $29,650 - $40,400
MPG: 19 City / 25 Hwy
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2007 Mercedes-Benz C Class Review

This review was written when the 2007 Mercedes-Benz C Class was new.

The C-Class delivers a well-engineered, comfortable and predictable ride with noteworthy safety features, but its styling is becoming dated and it can't match the lower sticker price of some of its direct competitors.  If you're in the market for an upscale midsize car, you should also consider the Acura TL, Lexus ES and BMW 3 Series.

Auto reviewers see the 2007 Mercedes-Benz C-Class as a practical, well-equipped, and relatively powerful sedan that's perfect for those that want luxury and prestige, but don't need a lot of passenger or cargo room.  The optional 3.5L engine in particular receives positive reviews from critics.  Edmunds says, "Although previously disregarded as a true sport sedan, this ... more powerful C350 Mercedes should earn a spot on any BMW shopper's short list."

The C-Class first debuted in 1984 and received a comprehensive redesign in 2001.  It is largely a carryover for 2007, though an all-new generation is slated for the 2008 model year.  Forbes urges buyers to consider the C-Class if "you must have a Benz but are on a budget, relatively speaking; you prefer compact and nimble sedans and don't usually need room for more than four adults and their stuff."

Pricewise, most reviewers see the C-Class as expensive for its small size, though several note it offers better value than most Mercedes cars do.  Forbes says "spending well over $30,000 for a compact car seems excessive."  BusinessWeek echoes "It's a bit pricey, even if it's cheap by Mercedes standards. For instance, the Infiniti G35 starts at $33,750 with all-wheel drive -- and comes with a 3.5 liter, 280-horsepower V6 with as much oomph as the engine in the Mercedes."

On the flip side, Kelley Blue Book says "Although priced slightly higher than similarly equipped models from Audi, Infiniti, Saab, Cadillac and Lexus, the C-Class can certainly match these vehicles in the areas of luxury, performance and value."  However, the reviewer also notes "Prestige has its price. The C-Class is tight on rear-seat legroom and can cost thousands more than comparably equipped European, American and Japanese rivals."  And while the base sticker may seem low for a luxury car, "option packages can add thousands to the bottom line."

As for resale value, Kelley Blue Book says "the C-Class falls short of typical Mercedes-Benz expectations. It has only a slightly better-than-average projected residual value over a four-year period, besting the Saab 9-3 and Cadillac CTS, but ranking far behind the values expected of the Audi A4, BMW 3 Series, Lexus IS and Infiniti G35."  IntelliChoice gives the base C230 model a "worse than average" value rating for its predicated five-year total cost of ownership, compared to vehicles in its class.

The C-Class is also offered as a sport coupe and a wagon, however, starting in 2008, the C-Class will be offered only as a sedan in U.S. markets.

Review Last Updated: 2/4/09

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