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Avg. Price Paid:$9,324 - $11,973
Original MSRP: $27,599 - $29,099
MPG: 15 City / 22 Hwy
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2008 Mitsubishi Endeavor Performance

These scores and this review are from when the car was new.

Review Last Updated: 2/18/09

The 2008 Mitsubishi Endeavor has solid, if not inspiring, performance. "The big engine's initial torque moves the Endeavor with grace, and the transmission's behavior is about perfect," says Car and Driver. "The steering is light and responsive, the ride is well mannered."

All trim levels of the Endeavor are powered by the same 3.8-liter 225-horsepower V6 engine and feature the same shiftable four-speed automatic transmission. Front-wheel drive and all-wheel-drive models are available.

Acceleration and Power

Rated at 225 horsepower, the 2008 Endeavor's V6 engine seems considerably behind the rest of its class in power. Surprisingly enough, its acceleration impresses most reviewers. "We weren't impressed with the power numbers for Endeavor's V6. Boy, did we change our tune when we put the pedal down. Smoothly leaping forward, the Endeavor returned a sport-sedan-like 0-60 time of 7.6-seconds. That's faster than the more powerful Honda Pilot," says Motor Week. Edmunds also reports "With a torque rating of 250 pound-feet, the Endeavor's V6 out-muscles both the Toyota Highlander and Honda Pilot in this important area, giving the Endeavor a far more responsive feel than its horsepower number might suggest."

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, front-wheel-drive models achieve an estimated 15 miles per gallon in town, 22 on the highway. All-wheel-drive Endeavors are rated at 15/19. All Endeavors require premium fuel.

The only transmission available, a manually-shiftable four-speed automatic, also seems very limited on paper. But again, Mitsubishi has squeezed surprisingly good performance from such simple architecture. "The transmission's behavior is about perfect," finds Car and Driver. "The transmission can be a little slow to downshift on highway grades,"

Handling and Braking

Auto writers consider the handling of the Mitsubishi Endeavor to be good for this class of vehicle. "Except for tall vehicle lean and body roll, the Endeavor performed like a well balanced front-drive sedan," comments Motor Week. Kelley Blue Book finds that "the Endeavor tracks straight and true, with no play felt in the direct and responsive steering. Its sleek shape also seems to be immune to strong crosswinds and buffeting." According to Car and Driver, the power-assisted steering "is light and responsive, the ride is well mannered. There are more refined drivetrains around, but the Endeavor's handling is as good as any competitor's."

All-Wheel Drive

Like most car-based SUVs, the Endeavor is not meant as a serious off-road vehicle, but performs reasonably well in inclement weather. "We wouldn't go so far as to call it "sporty," but city driving exposed no major deficiencies, and a brief foray down a rocky fire road revealed a sport-ute fully capable of handling itself when the pavement ended -- just don't expect to conquer any seriously challenging terrain," explains Edmunds.

On-road, Motor Week says, the "all-independent suspension, struts in front and multi-links in the rear, manhandled whatever came our way with no more fuss than a well engineered family sedan." But USA Today cautions that the rear suspension "hangs down in ugly fashion, threatening to snag any branch or rock en route to the fishin' hole. Mitsubishi cautions that Endeavor's for bad roads and bad weather, not true off- road use."

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