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#39

in Affordable Small Cars

MSRP: $17,195 - $38,195
Invoice: $16,469 - $36,584
MPG: 26 City / 34 Hwy
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Mitsubishi Lancer Interior

The 2014 Lancer’s hard, plastic interior looks very cheap, reviewers say, while a bland cabin design also detracts from the interior’s appeal. Some also comment that the cabin is quite noisy, detracting from ride comfort. Unlike most cars these days, the Lancer doesn’t offer a telescoping steering wheel, so it’s tough to find a good driving position, test drivers report. It has less cargo space than other cars in the class and lacks standard features like Bluetooth and a USB port, which are found in many rivals.

  • "While the 2014 Mitsubishi Lancer's chiseled exterior lends an air of aggression, its uninspired interior design drags down the car's overall appeal. Interior materials quality isn't good, either, as an abundance of hard plastic gives the Lancer a downmarket feel." -- Edmunds
  • "The 2014 Mitsubishi Lancer's sharp and modern exterior styling does not extend into its cabin. Here, the Lancer is showing its age, and bland, cheap plastic doesn't help." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Magnesium paddles and curiously high-grade soft-touch trim adorning the front door cards aside, the Lancer's interior simply screams low-buck. Knobs and switches work with all the sophistication of a used blender found at a garage sale, while some plastics are downright atrocious. The cheap carpet, which wouldn't be appropriate for a college kid's apartment, is especially heinous." -- Left Lane News
  • "I have to say that the interior is crummy. It looks outdated and the materials aren't that good. I could handle the level of materials used if the styling was better.” -- AutoWeek (2013)
  • "Noise suppression is arguably Lancer's worst attribute. All models have excessive levels of road noise, which effectively drowns out other audible sources, including the radio in some models." -- Consumer Guide (2013)

Seating

The 2014 Mitsubishi Lancer seats five and comes standard with a tilt steering wheel and a six-way adjustable driver’s seat. Available features include leather seats, heated front seats and a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob. Some test drivers complain that the steering wheel doesn’t telescope, which makes it hard to find a comfortable driving position. Still, others note that the 2014 Lancer offers comfortable seats with good head- and legroom in both rows, though one reviewer writes that the middle position in the rear seat isn’t very comfortable.

  • "Head and leg room are good in front and surprisingly good in back, too. Mitsubishi lists the Lancer Evo as a 5-passenger car, but it must mean only temporarily. An adult sitting in the middle rear position won't want to do so for very long." -- Consumer Guide (Evolution)
  • “On the other hand, the rear seats are quite comfortable, with a generous amount of legroom." -- Edmunds
  • "Finding a comfortable distance from the steering wheel is a hassle without a telescoping wheel. Sit too close, and front legroom disappears. Sit too far away, and the steering wheel is beyond a comfortable reach." -- Cars.com (2013)

Interior Features

The base Lancer sedan has a four-speaker CD audio system, keyless entry, steering wheel-mounted audio and cruise controls and an auxiliary audio jack. Buyers will have to upgrade to get features that are standard in many rivals, including Bluetooth, satellite radio and a USB port. Additional options include a rearview camera, sunroof and a nine-speaker Rockford Fosgate audio system with a hi-definition touch screen and Mitsubishi’s Fuse voice command system, which provides hands-free access to music on your smartphone or MP3 player.

The Lancer features clear gauges and straightforward climate controls, test drivers say. However, some reviewers say that the available touch-screen audio system could use more physical buttons to provide easier access to some settings. Additionally, some note that while Mitsubishi's Fuse system performs adequately, it also lacks some of the voice commands found on Ford’s Sync system.

See the full 2014 Mitsubishi Lancer features and specs »

  • "With a touch screen for all audio operations, the only controls on the center stack are easy-to-reach climate-control dials-simplicity itself." -- Consumer Guide (Evolution)
  • “Much like Ford's Sync system, Mitsubishi's Fuse voice activation system assists in selecting a destination or your favorite music. The Fuse system lacks some of Sync's functions and commands, but for the most part, it works pretty well." -- Edmunds
  • “Big, easy-to-read gauges flank a nice LCD screen accessed by convenient steering wheel-mounted switches. The new touchscreen audio system works well enough, but desperately needs a few conventional buttons for commonly-accessed functions." -- Left Lane News

Cargo

The Lancer sedan offers 12.3 cubic feet of cargo space, which is small, even for a compact car. Cargo space decreases to 11.8 cubic feet with an optional subwoofer. The Ralliart’s trunk measures 10 cubic feet and the Evolution sedan has 6.9 cubic feet of trunk space. Hatchback models have 13.8 cubic feet of space with the rear seats in use and 46.6 with the seats folded, which is good for a hatchback. Reviewers are disappointed with the Lancer sedan’s minimal cargo space, saying that it only gets smaller when you add the premium audio system.

  • "This (and a subwoofer from the optional premium sound system on the test car) reduces trunk capacity to perhaps a couple soft-sided bags. Golfers need not apply. Interior storage is so-so. There are good-sized door map pockets and two covered cup holders in the console, but the console box is deeper than it is long and it sits too far back to be an effective arm rest. There's a small cubby ahead of the shifter." -- Consumer Guide (Evolution model)
  • “Trunk capacity is also low for this class." -- Edmunds
Review Last Updated: 5/14/14

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