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#20

in Affordable Compact SUVs

MSRP: $19,470 - $23,995
Invoice: $18,648 - $22,982
MPG: 24 City / 30 Hwy
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Mitsubishi Outlander Sport Performance

Play 2014 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport Performance Review Video Video: Outlander Sport Performance 2014 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport Performance Video Review

Test drivers are unimpressed with the 2014 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport's underpowered engine, which they say is noisy and contributes to the Outlander Sport’s sluggish acceleration. Reviewers are also displeased with the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport's transmission options, but say the five-speed manual makes the Outlander Sport feel a bit peppier. Automotive journalists say the Outlander Sport handles adequately for normal driving conditions and is easy to maneuver, though some say that it leans a bit through corners on curvy roads.

  • "Getting around in the 2014 Outlander Sport is unobtrusively easy. The driving position is comfortable and, thanks to the somewhat high profile, the driver has a great view of the road and traffic." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "While the standard 5-speed manual transmission makes the best of it, most Outlander Sports have a continuously variable automatic (CVT) that seems to generate more noise than forward progress." -- AutoTrader
  • "The Outlander Sport's lightness and smaller size could be expected to translate into a certain agility, but the Sport's suspension tuning is too soft to make handling entertaining and the 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, borrowed from the Lancer compact car, lacks power, particularly when matched with the Sport's continuously variable transmission." -- Edmunds (2013)
  • "The engine is always heard, and it sounds somewhat coarse during full-throttle acceleration. The CVT doesn't help here as it can allow engine speed to race ahead of road speed." -- Consumer Guide (2012) 

Acceleration and Power

The 2014 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport comes with a 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 148 horsepower. A five-speed manual transmission comes standard and a continuously variable transmission (CVT) is optional. The base Outlander Sport gets an EPA-estimated 24/30 mpg city/highway, which is good for the class. 

Reviewers are displeased with the Outlander Sport's engine and say that it's weak and noisy compared to some rivals’engines. As a result, they write that the Outlander Sport is slow and struggles to accelerate. Test drivers are unimpressed with both transmission options, but say models equipped with the five-speed manual are the better choice because they feel a bit faster.

  • "The engine is this Mitsu's weak link. The mandatory 2.0-liter 4-cylinder is noisy and slow compared to others in the segment, while the CVT is less responsive than we'd like. Moreover, CVT-equipped Outlander Sports feel slower than the manual-transmission ES." -- AutoTrader
  • "Choose the 5-speed manual transmission (available only on the base ES trim level with 2-wheel drive) and you'll find it light, easy and precise. The continuously-variable automatic transmission includes handy paddle shifters mounted on the steering wheel for manual control." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "The CVT automatic is a boon to economy, but does no favors for the Sport's already meager engine power, making for lackadaisical acceleration." -- Edmunds (2013)
  • "With either transmission, the engine tends to run out of steam at high speeds prompting a deep stab of the accelerator pedal or a downshift to summon the meager passing reserves." -- Consumer Guide (2012)  

Handling and Braking

Auto writers agree that the 2014 Outlander Sport performs well enough for a daily driver, and a few reviewers note that its compact size makes it easy to maneuver in small spaces. However, some test drivers think that the Outlander Sport isn’t particularly agile when cornering at higher speeds. The Outlander Sport comes with front-wheel drive. All-wheel drive is optional and one auto writer notes that the system is good in snowy weather, but still isn't rugged enough for all conditions.

  • "This is a softly sprung crossover designed for urban duty, and that's as it should be. The available all-wheel-drive system is a nice feature for snowy climes, but it doesn't transform the Outlander Sport into a real SUV by any means. Happily, the Sport is an agreeable companion on the pavement, riding smoothly and fairly quietly for a bargain-priced SUV." -- AutoTrader
  • "Parking and dealing with tight traffic couldn't be easier, as the excellent visibility and the tidy size make it a snap to zip in and out of snug parking spots or work through crowded streets." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Sharp turns can induce some body lean, but this SUV is well composed otherwise. Brakes are strong with good pedal feel." -- Consumer Guide (2012) 
  • "With a suspension that is neither too cushy nor too firm, the Outlander Sport is fine for straight-line cruising. Although we enjoyed the relative sharpness and feel offered by the steering rack, the Outlander suffers from waves of body roll at anything higher than average Grand Marquis cornering speeds." -- Car and Driver (2011)
Review Last Updated: 5/15/14

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