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2010 Porsche 911 GT3 Review

This review was written when the 2010 Porsche 911 GT3 was new.

The 2010 Porsche 911 GT3 is cocked, locked and ready to rock. Tuned for the track and featuring a die-hard RS trim, the GT3 is the Porsche lineup’s highly-acclaimed bad boy.

Model Overview

The 911 GT3 is a performance-tuned variant of the Porsche 911 Carrera, which reigns supreme in the class of super luxury sports cars for its powerful engine options and outstanding handling capabilities.

In all, the 911 Carrera is available in nine trims and four body styles. While all impress, only the GT3 and GT3 RS are track tuned. They fall short of the 911 Turbo’s 500-horspower rating, but are better equipped to run laps. Test drivers are impressed -- declaring the GT3 the best of the best. Car and Driver writes: "To many people, the Porsche 911 Carrera is the definitive sports car, but in the 911 family, the top jock is the GT3."

After a year of absence, the GT3 is back and better than ever. Its mechanical underpinnings have been refreshed to provide more power and the 2010 weighs less than the 2008 model. All-new for 2010 is an even more hardcore trim, the GT3 RS. Both are coupes.

  • "Though we rarely meet a Porsche we don't like, the 911 GT3 - a hardcore, track-tuned version of the legendary sports car - has always occupied a soft spot in our hearts. That likely won't change, as the 2010 Porsche 911 GT3 has grown in all the right places." -- Automobile Magazine
  • "Completely street-legal, the RS version is everything the GT3 is, but even more serious." -- Road and Track

The Bottom Line

The 2010 Porsche 911 GT3 and GT3 RS are dynamic performers that can hang with exotics twice their price. However, they don’t make much sense for anyone but track rats. If you’re in the market for a super luxury sports car and don’t plan on running laps, you can save up to $55,000 by opting for a base-model 911 Carrera instead. With the money you’ll save, you can buy a Lotus Elise for those once-in-a-while weekend track runs.

If you’re looking for a car that excels on both road and track, you can save bundles by opting for a Nissan GT-R. It’s priced below $80K and features 35 more horsepower than the GT3 RS. It also hits 60 mph from a standstill in the low three-second range. Its handling dynamics may not be as track-tuned as the GT3’s, but it sure is a lot faster.

While the GT3 costs $112,300, the GT3 RS starts at nearly $20K more.

Performance Dynamics

Neither the GT3 nor the GT3 RS has been extensively tested. However, those that have driven them report that they’re every bit as awesome as one would expect a track-tuned 911 Carrera to be.

The 911 GT3 is equipped with a rear-mounted 3.8-liter six-cylinder engine that produces 435 horsepower at 7,600 rpm and 317 pound-feet of torque at 1,950 to 5,000 rpm. Using the same engine, the GT3 RS generates 450 horsepower at 7,900 rpm. Both feature a standard six-speed manual transmission. Porsche’s Doppelkupplung (PDK) transmission is not available on either model.

According to Porsche, the GT3 has a top speed of 194 mph and can accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in four seconds. Meanwhile, the GT3 RS maxes out at 193 mph and blasts from 0 to 60 mph 0.2 seconds quicker. Helping the GT3 RS achieve that faster time is a more aerodynamic design, increased power and less weight.

The EPA rates the GT3’s city/highway fuel economy at 14/21 mpg.

The all-wheel-drive 911 GT3 and GT3 RS feature a variable-steering ratio with hydraulic power-assist. In addition to independent front and rear suspension settings, it also features Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) -- which, through the use of sensors, alters suspension settings to match driving style and road conditions. Porsche Stability Management (PSM), which monitors driver inputs and employs selective braking in order to avoid oversteer and understeer, is also standard. Monobloc aluminum fixed-caliper brakes with an anti-lock braking system come standard, as does a sport exhaust system with central dual tailpipes. High-performance ceramic brakes are optional.

  • "The previous car's 3.6-liter flat-six engine is eschewed in favor of a new 3.8-liter unit. It's good for 435 hp, a 20-hp increase that Porsche attributes to both the extra displacement and the addition of variable cam timing. Notably absent, however, are direct fuel injection, a technology increasingly seen on Porsche's latest models. Also missing is the new PDK dual-clutch transmission - the new GT3 comes only with a six-speed manual… No worries - even without the fancy transaxle and fuel delivery system, the new GT3's still a verifiable rocket." -- Automobile Magazine
  • "After a one-year hiatus, the GT3 is back and better than ever. A larger and more powerful engine now revs to a glorious 8500 rpm. Active engine mounts are new, as is stability control, which can thankfully be shut off completely. The RS has a wider stance, more power, and less weight." -- Car and Driver
  • "Other RS changes include a 6-speed manual transmission (the only gearbox available) with both shorter gear ratios and shorter throws than in the GT3. A new option on the RS is a lithium-ion battery, which reduces weight by over 22 lb. The car also comes with RS-specific tuning for its active suspension, along with wider front and rear tracks and similarly widened bodywork. You can spot an RS easily by its giant carbon-fiber fixed rear wing." -- Road and Track
Review Last Updated: 3/9/10

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