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#32

in 2012 Affordable Small Cars

Avg. Price Paid: $10,468 - $10,468
Original MSRP: $15,265 - $15,265
MPG: 36 City / 37 Hwy
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2012 Scion iQ Interior

This interior review was created when the car was new. Some links may no longer point to an active page.

While Scion crammed a lot of high-quality standard features into the iQ, reviewers say it’s nearly impossible to fit two back seat passengers comfortably. 

  • "The interior is a genuinely enjoyable place to spend a bit of time, with relatively high-quality, soft-touch plastics up front that predictably devolve into lower-class kit further down." -- Autoblog 

Seating

Most 6-foot-tall drivers will have enough leg and head space in the iQ, but test drivers say seat comfort gets hairy when two rear-seat passengers are added to the mix. First off, climbing into the rear row will be a hassle for everyone except children, and if the front seats are pushed back, there won’t be any leg space. With such limited passenger accommodations, reviewers think it’s a good idea to use the iQ as a two-seater, and fold down the rear seats to maximize cargo space.

  • "Even with the passenger seat thrown forward for ingress, it’s a chore to get to the rear seat. It’s not roomy back there, but that there’s any space at all is a miracle of packaging efficiency and owes something to the engine placement." -- Car and Driver
  • "Surprisingly enough, you don't feel like you're in a clown car when you're behind the wheel. There's no bumping of elbows or rubbing of shoulders or complaints of violated air space. ..." -- Edmunds
  • "Two people can fit comfortably, but we wouldn't inflict a long ride in the back seat on anyone we like." -- AutoWeek
  • "The seats, thin and lacking any serious bolstering, kept us comfortable during a pair of hour-plus stints behind the wheel. …" -- Autoblog

Interior Features

Reviewers couldn’t be more pleased with the Scion iQ’s standard features list. Each iQ has a higher-quality Pioneer audio system, HD radio, Bluetooth, auxiliary and USB connectivity and a leather-wrapped tilt and telescopic steering wheel with audio controls. Satellite radio and navigation are optional. 

Most test drivers think interior quality is good and the controls are logical, but one reviewer does think the high-end Pioneer audio system has poor sound quality. 

  • "Inside, the driver faces a thick, flat-bottomed, three-spoke steering wheel covered in red-stitched leather and an instrument panel that nestles the tach in the lower right quadrant of the speedometer. And there’s an information screen to the left of those. It’s a compact, logical, and legible arrangement." -- Car and Driver
  • "The materials are high-standard, and the feature list starts with a 160-watt audio system with Bluetooth, hands-free phone and streaming-audio ability." -- Popular Mechanics
  • "The Pandora interface worked great, with easy access to the station list." -- CNET
  • "As usual, Scion's choice of radios leaves something to be desired. Even the top-spec system, a 200-watt Pioneer system with four speakers, offers poor sound quality." -- Autoblog

Cargo 

The automotive press is surprised that the Scion iQ has up to 16.7 cubic feet of cargo room with the rear seats folded down, which is more than the Smart Fortwo’s maximum cargo capacity. That number decreases to 3.5 cubic feet with the rear seats up, but because the rear seats are so cramped, reviewers say many shoppers will be able to put the 16.7 cubic feet to good use. 

  • "The iQ is no bigger on the inside than the outside, of course, but the full-length seat travel and full-size doors make it easy to climb in and out, while the rear hatch opens to reveal 3.5 cubic feet with the rear 50/50-split folding seatbacks in place and a very useful 16.7 cubic feet when the seatbacks go down." -- Edmunds
  • "But the iQ packs some surprising utility." -- CNET
Used car average prices are provided by ClearBook™, a TrueCar™ product