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MSRP: $78,555 - $78,555
Invoice: $70,307 - $70,307
MPG: 13 City / 18 Hwy
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2013 Toyota Land Cruiser Interior

Toyota revised the Land Cruiser’s interior for 2013 and reviewers say that the cabin is one of Toyota’s best. The Land Cruiser comes in one trim that is loaded with the latest technology and comfort features, but also comes with a high price tag. Critics feel that the first- and second-row seats are luxurious, but that the third-row seats are only comfortable for children, which is a common gripe for the class. Also, the Land Cruiser’s unconventional folding third row limits its cargo space. As a result, the Land Cruiser trails competitors like the Infiniti QX56 and Cadillac Escalade in overall storage space. While one auto critic says the Land Cruiser can’t quite compete with its upscale cousin, the Lexus LX, reviewers are impressed with the Land Cruiser’s fit and finish.

  • "Inside, there's the ambiance of old-world opulence: the seats and door panels are trimmed in soft leather, real-wood adorns the dash and steering wheel and fit-and-finish is impeccable." -- Left Lane News
  • "The Lexus LX is just $3,000 more, but it looks and feels more than $3,000 more refined to the eye and skin. Still, the Land Cruiser has a lot going for it in terms of comfort." -- Cars.com
  • "Virtually every surface that can be is richly padded except the console, and most materials would look at home in a luxury sedan. Workmanship is likewise impressive." -- Consumer Guide (2011)

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Seating

The Land Cruiser offers room for up to eight in three rows of seats, which is typical for the class. As part of the Land Cruiser’s 2013 refresh, Toyota equipped the interior with perforated leather trim for all three rows of seats and multi-stage heated seats for the first and second row. The front seats are also power-adjustable and the second-row seats can slide and recline. The second row can fit three child safety seats. Reviewers say the first two rows are plenty comfortable, but that the third row is only comfortable for children. However, this is a common complaint for third rows in the class.

  • "In the Land Cruiser, front- and second-row seats are exceptionally comfortable over long hauls, with plenty of room in every direction. The third row is tight and uncomfortable, like most third rows I encounter." -- Cars.com
  • "Large, comfortable seats with lots of adjustments combine with a tilt and telescopic steering wheel and ample headroom and legroom for first-class accommodations. Visibility is OK except to the rear corners, particularly with the 3rd-row seats stowed. Standard rear-obstacle detection helps, as does the optional (with navigation system) rearview camera. Ingress and egress are easy enough." -- Consumer Guide (2011)

Interior Features

 Previously optional features like a rear-seat entertainment system, a navigation system, heated second-row seats, a heated, leather-wrapped steering wheel with voice and Bluetooth mounted controls and rain-sensing wipers are standard on the 2013 Land Cruiser. The Land Cruiser also has Toyota’s new hard drive-based navigation system equipped with an 8-inch touch screen, satellite radio, a USB port, a backup camera and Entune multimedia services, which allows access to live weather and traffic as well as apps like Pandora and Bing.

Reviewers say that the dashboard controls are logically placed and easy to operate. While the navigation integrates some of the audio and climate controls, critics think they are easy to use, even through the touch-screen system. One reviewer especially likes Toyota’s Entune infotainment system, which he says is easy to use.

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  • "The Land Cruiser's updated navigation system features Entune, Toyota's new infotainment offering, and includes advanced voice recognition to create a user-friendly multimedia experience." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Large gauges are clearly marked and easy to see. The turn-signal and wiper levers move with typical Toyota smoothness, as do other switches. All audio, climate, and navigation controls are mounted high on the dashboard within easy reach. The navigation system absorbs the radio-station-select buttons and some of the automatic climate-control functions, though temperature and fan speed are separate. Although this complicates some adjustments, the virtual buttons for both systems can be easily called up on the dashboard touchscreen, and they're simple to decipher and use. Also, redundant station-select and volume buttons are on the steering wheel." -- Consumer Guide (2011)

Cargo

For such a large vehicle, reviewers are disappointed with the Land Cruiser’s cargo space and utility. The Land Cruiser has 16.1 cubic feet of cargo space behind the third row and a total of 81.7 cubic feet behind the first row. Comparatively, the Cadillac Escalade has 108.9 cubic feet of cargo room behind the first row. Instead of a flat-folding third row, there is a 50/50-split third-row bench that folds against the Land Cruiser’s interior walls, which critics say leaves a narrow opening for gear and eats into the available cargo space.  

  • "Toyota decided to stick with an outdated split-bench design in which the two halves flip up and stow at the cargo bay's sides. The design isn't just awkward; it actually eats up quite a bit of cargo space." -- Kelley Blue Book
  • "Another problem is the Land Cruiser's scant cargo space for such a large vehicle." -- Cars.com
  • "With the rear seats in place, cargo space is 16 cubic feet or about the same as a midsize car's trunk. The third-row seats do not fold down, nor are they removable. Instead, they fold up against the sides of the cargo bay -- a rather awkward solution. Consequently, the Cruiser's maximum cargo capacity is modest at 82 cubic feet, which is a relatively small figure for a large SUV." -- Edmunds (2011)
Review Last Updated: 5/22/14

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